Did George Washington Predict America’s Fall?





Photo credit: Joye~ (Creative Commons)

It’s that bustling time between Thanksgiving and Christmas (Christ’s Mass), our nationally recognized and congressionally “established” birthday celebration for Jesus, the sovereign Lord of all mankind. Now is a valuable opportunity to reflect upon our nation’s past, present, and future (our true past, not the historically revised version propagated by secular-”progressives”).

First, for the public school-educated: No, Thanksgiving was not about high-fiving the Indians for corn on the cob. In his 1789 Thanksgiving Day Proclamation, George Washington made abundantly clear exactly Whom America should thank, and why.

Washington began by declaring that “it is the duty of all nations to acknowledge the providence of Almighty God, to obey His will, to be grateful for His benefits, and humbly to implore His protection and favor” so that a special day might “be devoted by the people of these States to the service of that great and glorious Being who is the beneficent author of all the good that was, that is, or that will be; that we may then all unite in rendering unto Him our sincere and humble thanks for His kind care and protection of the people of this country” as well as “for the civil and religious liberty with which we are blessed.”

Oh, how times have changed.

That, while “acknowledging with grateful hearts the many and signal favors of Almighty God,” continued Washington, America might “unite in most humbly offering our prayers and supplications to the great Lord and Ruler of Nations” in a concerted effort “to promote the knowledge and practice of true religion and virtue.”

You with me, Supreme Court?

Now, lest there be any confusion as to the identity of “the great Lord and Ruler of Nations” to Whom Washington referred, President John Adams, Washington’s successor, ordered, in 1799, a day of “solemn humiliation, fasting, and prayer,” wherein he proclaimed that Americans should, “on that day abstain as far as may be from their secular occupations, devote the time to the sacred duties of religion in public and in private: That they call to mind our numerous offenses against the most High God, confess them before Him with the sincerest penitence, implore His pardoning mercy, through the great Mediator and Redeemer, for our past transgressions, and that, through the grace of His Holy Spirit, we may be disposed and enabled to yield a more suitable obedience to His righteous requisitions in time to come.”

“Separation of church and state”?

Not so much.

I know. Calm down, atheists. It wasn’t a theocratic dictate requiring that you bow your knee before Jesus. Christians don’t force conversion. After all, contrary to Barack Hussein Obama’s claim otherwise, we are not a “Muslim country” – yet. It was just a firm suggestion. As for bowing before Christ, God will see to that later.

Imagine if anti-Christian outfits like the ACLU or the so-called “Freedom From Religion Foundation” (FFRF) had been around back then. At a time when Americans’ freedoms were protected under an authentic First Amendment application, these counter-constitutionalists would have been laughed out of town (or worse) upon their first frivolous “Establishment Clause” lawsuit.

Still, George Washington’s myriad “declarations of American dependence” upon God were not all sunshine and fuzzy bunnies. Many took on a decidedly somber tone, clearly intended to warn both his patriotic contemporaries and, most especially, future generations.

America’s reluctant first chief executive sought to forestall the predictably devastating consequences of a national break from America’s Judeo-Christian moorings.

In fact, during his Farewell Address, Washington spoke of exactly the kind of subversive, anti-theist provocateurs who make up the aforementioned ACLU, FFRF, et al. He called them unpatriotic. He underscored the critical role religion and morality play to our national survival and, though he did not specifically identify them as such, warned of secular-”progressives” like Barack Obama – a man who, exposed as a serial liar, would later bring great shame upon the noble office Washington first held.

“Of all the dispositions and habits which lead to political prosperity,” declared Washington, “Religion and Morality are indispensable supports. In vain would that man claim the tribute of Patriotism, who should labor to subvert these great pillars of human happiness, these firmest props of the duties of Men and Citizens. … [R]eason and experience both forbid us to expect that national morality can prevail in exclusion of religious principle.”

Regrettably, Washington’s parting words exemplify, to a great extent, the current state of affairs in the very government he helped to bring about.

“Let it simply be asked,” he warned, “‘where is the security for property, for reputation, for life, if the sense of religious obligation desert the oaths which are the instruments of investigation in courts of justice?”

Where indeed? Not only have our courts of justice abandoned any “sense of religious obligation,” they increasingly seek to subvert “we the people’s” very freedom to exercise such obligation.

Is it any wonder, then, that, with a government that weaponizes the IRS, brushes off the gross moral failings of our public servants, and facilitates the brutal slaughter of tens of millions of its most vulnerable citizens – security for property, reputation, and life has disappeared?

Continued Washington: “It is substantially true that virtue or morality is a necessary spring of popular government. The rule indeed extends with more or less force to every species of free government. Who that is a sincere friend to it can look with indifference upon attempts to shake the foundation of the fabric?”

That “necessary spring” of “virtue and morality” has run dry. A “constitutional right” for sodomy-based “marriage”? – a sin both Washington and the criminal codes called an “infamous crime”? Seriously? A government mandate that Christians fund your abortion homicide, despite a non-negotiable biblical command to do no such thing? Are you kidding?

The foundation has fractured. The fabric has frayed.

In 1788, eight years prior to his Farewell Address, Washington wrote: “[T]he [federal] government … can never be in danger of degenerating into a monarchy, an oligarchy, an aristocracy, or any other despotic or oppressive form so long as there shall remain any virtue in the body of the people.”

We are in danger. As our national virtue melts away, it strains credulity to deny that we are entering, as Washington warned, a dark era of American despotism. Like water to the gulch, such despotism pervades in the absence of religion and morality.

And as history has shown, the despotic nation is not long for the world.

 

Matt Barber (@jmattbarber on Twitter) is an author, columnist, cultural analyst and an attorney concentrating in constitutional law. Having retired as an undefeated heavyweight professional boxer, Matt has taken his fight from the ring to the culture war.     

 

Photo credit: Joye~ (Creative Commons)





The True Reason for Thanksgiving

By Mary Beth Brown, Expose Obama

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Over time, myths and distortions have arisen, twisting the reason for Thanksgiving Day. For starters, the Pilgrims did not hold their harvest festival to thank the local Indians. Unfortunately, this myth is often perpetuated in schools and textbooks. Many children and adults now believe we celebrate the help given to the Pilgrims by Native Americans. If the Pilgrims were to visit this Thanksgiving, they would be shocked.

The Pilgrims focused on thanking and praising God for His love, for all that He had done for them, and for the freedom they enjoyed in the New World.

A glimpse into the history of Thanksgiving Day gives a greater appreciation of this great American holiday. Even earlier than the Pilgrims, people of faith set aside days for prayer and thanksgiving to God. Many times rather than a feast, they were a time dedicated to prayer.

It may come as a surprise to some that the word holiday is actually from old English compound word combining holy and day. Merriam-Webster dictionary defines holiday as “a day set aside for special religious observance.”

The ancient Hebrews had many days set apart to worship, praise and thank God. Passover and Succoth are holy days of gratitude to God for His loving-kindness and deliverance from Egypt.

Early Americans often held days of thanksgiving in the various states and commonwealths. Washington and Madison each proclaimed a day of thanksgiving while president.

In October 1789, President George Washington signed a proclamation requested by Congress “to recommend to the people of the United States a Day of Public thanksgiving and Prayer, to be observed by acknowledging with grateful hearts the many and signal favors of almighty God, especially by affording them an opportunity peaceably to form a government for their safety and happiness.”

Washington then assigned the twenty-sixth day of November “to be devoted by the people… to the service of that great and glorious Being who is the beneficent author of all the good that was, that is, or that will be;” and to “all unite in rendering unto Him our sincere and humble thanks for His kind care and protection of the people of this country…”

It was to remember, Washington said, God’s “manifold mercies” and providence, “for the civil and religious liberty with which we are blessed,” and, “in general, for all the great and various favors” He gave them.

In the dark days of the Civil War in 1863, Lincoln proclaimed, by Act of Congress, an annual National Day of Thanksgiving following a letter campaign promoting the idea by Sarah Hale. As a mother, widowed at the age of 34, Hale was the editor of the first woman’s magazine in America and campaigned for over 40 years to make Thanksgiving a national holiday.

Lincoln’s words are especially timely now with our soldiers fighting in Afghanistan and Iraq, “I do therefore invite my fellow citizens in every part of the United States, and also those who are at sea and those who are sojourning in foreign land, to set apart and observe the last Thursday of November…as a day of Thanksgiving and Praise to our beneficent Father who dwelleth in the Heavens.”

He recommends that we “commend to his tender care all those who have become widows, orphans, mourners or sufferers” from the war and to look at the many blessings we have been given by God including “which are so constantly enjoyed that we are prone to forget the source from which they come… Almighty God…”

“…But we have forgotten God. We have forgotten the gracious hand which preserved us in peace and multiplied and enriched and strengthened us, and we have vainly imagine, by the deceitfulness of our hearts, that all these blessing were produced by some superior wisdom and virtue of our own…”

In conclusion, Lincoln says, “It has seemed to me fit and proper that God should be solemnly, reverently and gratefully acknowledged, as with one heart and one voice, by the whole American people…”

Even amongst the pain, upheaval and difficulties of the Civil War, the nation came together for a day of thanksgiving and praise.

Sadly, someone erroneously wrote in Wikipedia, “Thanksgiving Day is … a time to give thanks for the harvest and express gratitude in general…While perhaps religious in origin, Thanksgiving is now primarily identified as a secular holiday.” Maybe this is true for some Americans, but certainly not for all. And definitely not the way the “Mother of the American Thanksgiving,” Sarah Hale visualized it.

Hale wrote, “Let this day…be the grand Thanksgiving Holiday of our nation, when the noise and tumult of worldliness may be exchanged for the laugh of happy children, the glad greeting of family reunion, and the humble gratitude of the Christian heart.”

And Edward Martin wisely reminds us, "Thanksgiving Day comes, by statute, once a year; to the honest man it comes as frequently as the heart of gratitude will allow."