Watch: A Hollywood Star Just Blamed Ronald Reagan For Something Unbelievable

Hollywood leftists are often quick to blame previous Republican administrations – most notably George W. Bush – for the ills currently plaguing America. For at least one actress, however, the true blame for one such issue lies with a president whose initial term began more than 35 years ago.

Long heralded as a heroic figure among American conservatives, Ronald Reagan became an object of ridicule for Susan Sarandon in a recent PBS interview. Sarandon appeared on Tavis Smiley to promote a documentary her son produced to share stories of homelessness.

When asked if the issue is still applicable in today’s America, Sarandon ventured off on a retrospective journey through the 1980s.

“I think that the conversation changed around the Reagan era,” she said, “where everything was your fault; and so you were blamed for not trying hard enough, for drinking, for drugs, whatever.”

She went on to compare the conservative approach to dealing with homelessness to her recollection of how AIDS patients were treated in the disease’s early days.

“Just like in the AIDS epidemic,” she declared, “the focus went on your lifestyle as opposed to what was actually happening.”

The social media reaction to her comments was largely critical, with many users questioning why her opinion matters at all.

“I wish media would stop giving these Hollywood idiots & hypocrites a voice,” one comment read.

Another accused Sarandon and other dyed-in-the-wool leftists of holding on to their “scapegoats” even when “what they’ve been blamed with turns out to be a lie!”

Is it finally time for the left to stop blaming Ronald Reagan? Share your thoughts in the comments section below.

This post originally appeared on Western Journalism – Equipping You With The Truth

Red Tape Rising Under Obama At Unprecedented Rate

A new report finds that major regulation imposed by the Obama administration cost Americans more than $80 billion per year over the past six years. That figure is more than twice as much as what the rules issued by the administration of George W. Bush six years in cost the population.

The Heritage Foundation report, “Red Tape Rising: Six Years of Escalating Regulation Under Obama,” documents an increase of 27 major rules in 2014, which brings the administration’s total to 184.

At this point in the Bush administration, only 76 major rules had been adopted at a cost of $30.7 billion, which represents 38.5 percent of the Obama administration’s cost.

Not surprisingly, the Obama administration has also overseen the weakest economic recovery in modern U.S. history. Now, five years into the Obama recovery, the economy grew a paltry 0.2 percent during the first quarter. Economic growth for Obama’s tenure in office has averaged a little over 2 percent, less than half the growth rate under Ronald Reagan following the last severe recession.

Image Credit: Washington Times,

Image Credit: Washington Times

Regulations under the Dodd-Frank banking reform law and of the energy sector topped the list of the most regulations adopted during the past year.

The Daily Signal reports:

Many more regulations are on the way, with another 126 economically significant rules on the administration’s agenda, such as directives to farmers for growing and harvesting fruits and vegetables; strict limits on credit access for service members; and, yet another redesign of light bulbs.

Among the most anticipated rules is finalization of the Environmental Protection Agency’s stricter standards on emissions of ozone, which many analysts predict will be the most costly regulation ever imposed by any agency.

One reform proposed by members of Congress is the REINS Act, which would require congressional approval before implementing any major new regulations.

As reported by Western Journalism, Canada has taken action to tackle the hidden taxes imposed on its economy by regulations. The Red Tape Reduction Act (C-21) requires that for every new regulation introduced by the Canadian federal government, one of equal burden must be removed from the books.

Conservative Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper has labeled red tape “the silent killer of jobs.” For businesses, an unnecessary regulatory burden seems to take away time and resources that could be used to create new products or improve existing ones, or to better serve customers. For consumers, regulations appear to mean higher costs and less competition.

One of Ronald Reagan’s first acts as President of the United States was to sign an executive order requiring all federal agencies to conduct a cost/benefit analysis for all proposed regulations and in reviewing existing ones.

The reduction of the regulatory burden during Reagan’s tenure in office helped significantly in igniting the greatest economic expansion in United States history.

According to the National Association of Manufacturers, the cost of federal regulations alone to the United States economy was over $2 trillion in 2012. Eighty-eight percent of businesses surveyed identified federal regulations as their top challenge.

This post originally appeared on Western Journalism – Equipping You With The Truth

Canada Becomes First Country To Require For Every New Regulation, One Of Equal Burden Being Removed

Canada has taken action to tackle the hidden taxes imposed on its economy  by regulations. The Red Tape Reduction Act (C-21) requires that for every new regulation introduced by the Canadian federal government, one of equal burden must be removed from the books.

C-21 is the first law of its kind in the world, according to the Financial Post. C-21 has been in effect as policy in Canada for several years, but now it has been officially codified. The law operates essentially as a cap on the cost of regulations on the economy and the Canadian people.

The latest estimate from the Canadian Federation of Independent Business suggests that regulation costs $37 billion a year. Local small business owners suggest that 30 percent could be taken from that burden ($11 billion), without any impact on human health, safety, or the environment.

The Canadian province of British Columbia has cut its regulatory burden by 40 percent over the last decade, with no one arguing the cuts have made a negative impact, according to the Financial Post.

Conservative Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper (pictured above) has labeled red-tape “the silent killer of jobs.” For businesses, an unnecessary regulatory burden seems to take away time and resources that could be used to create new products or improve existing ones or to better serve their customers. For consumers, regulations appear to mean higher costs and less competition.

According to the National Association of Manufacturers, the cost of federal regulations alone to the United States economy was over $2 trillion in 2012. Eighty-eight percent of businesses surveyed identified federal regulations as their top challenge.

One of Ronald Reagan’s first acts as President of the United States was to sign an executive order requiring all federal agencies to conduct a cost/benefit analysis for all proposed regulations and in reviewing existing ones.

The reduction of the regulatory burden during Reagan’s tenure in office is one of the major factors in igniting the greatest economic expansion in United States history.

It would appear the Canadians are taking a play from Reagan’s playbook.

This post originally appeared on Western Journalism – Equipping You With The Truth

Obama Vs. Conservatives: Sports Edition!

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Courtesy of LouderWithCrowder.com 

It’s the opening week of baseball season… the last week of March Madness (in April)… and most real sports fans are just waiting for hockey and football seasons to resume. We kid, we kid! We love ALL sports, equally. Kind of.

In honor of this most momentous week in 2015 sports culture, we give you the President, a self-proclaimed athlete, vs. conservatives who are actually athletic. Enjoy!

BASEBALL – Throwing like a girl is what we’d call it, if the incident in the video below wasn’t a complete insult to all females, everywhere.

Compare President Obama’s wild pitching motion to the signature perfect strike of former President George W. Bush:

 

BASKETBALL – nothin’ but bricks for the President’s favorite sport! Ouch.

But you know, Sarah Palin was a real high school basketball star.  Talk about shootin’ like a girl!

 

GOLF – 200 plus rounds. Really slow rounds. Like 5 and 6 hours slow. That’s what happens when you’re a 20+ handicap, I suppose…

Compare that to President George H.W. Bush – who’s in the World Golf Hall of Fame. He was given the PGA of America Distinguished Service Award in 1997 and the USGA’s 2008 Bob Jones Award and the PGA TOUR Lifetime Achievement Award in 2009. Not only could the man golf; he made huge contributions to the sport itself!

 

BOWLING – we didn’t even know it was possible to bowl a 37 until Barack Obama became President and promptly showed us how it’s done! Just. So. AWKWARD.

President Nixon may be best remembered for Watergate, but he was also an avid sports fan. President and Mrs. Nixon both enjoyed bowling, and in 1969 had a one-lane alley built beneath the North Portico of the White House using private funds. His high score? A pretty impressive 232.

President Nixon bowling at the White House Bowling Alley.  3/10/70.<br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /> The White House Bowling Alley first opened in 1947 while Harry S. Truman was in office.  In 1955, it was moved across the street to the Old Executive Building. <br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /> Richard and Pat Nixon both enjoyed bowling, and so in 1969 they had a one-lane alley built beneath the North Portico using private funds. <br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /> -More photos from the Nixon Centennial at the Nixon Library

 

FOOTBALL – Barack Obama said he’d never let his son play football. Considering how he himself “plays” football (and most other sports), that’s probably best.

Did you know Ronald Reagan attended Eureka College in Illinois on an athletic scholarship? He played football, ran track, captained the swim team, AND served as student council president. Now there’s a man’s man for you.

 

BIKING – the Presidential picture that’s worth a thousand words. Seriously.

President George W. Bush does some biking of his own. Real biking. With wounded warriors. Across deserts. And mountains. It’s a 100K. AWESOME.

This post originally appeared on Western Journalism – Informing And Equipping Americans Who Love Freedom

Democrats Want Reagan National Airport Name Change

Photo credit: Gage Skidmore (Creative Commons)

A poll commissioned by the Washington Post found that the vast majority of Democrats and nearly half of all respondents prefer the name Washington National Airport to its current name, Ronald Reagan National Airport. The airport was called Washington National Airport from 1941, when it opened, until the name was changed to Ronald Reagan National Airport in 1998 to honor the nation’s 40th president.

The poll asked over 42,000 people by what name they referred to the airport, which sits across the Potomac River from the Washington Mall. Forty-one percent referred to the airport as National, 31 percent as Reagan, 13 percent as DCA, and 12 percent as Reagan National. So, a slim majority, 43 percent, include Reagan’s name in the title.

A couple factors help explain the differences in what people call the airport, but political affiliation and age were the most determinant. The poll skews Democrat with 62 as being from that party, 18 percent Independent, 12 percent Republican, and 8 percent other. That Reagan did as well as he did, given that breakdown, is impressive. Additionally, the name was changed less than a generation ago (17 years); so for many, they are simply in the habit of calling it National.

Overall, 50 percent of Democrats in the poll call the airport National, while 35 percent call it either Reagan or Reagan National. With Republicans, the numbers more than flip, with 72 percent calling it either of the two Reagan variants (see chart below).

The numbers and time are working against those who may wish to revert the airport back to its former name. The majority of the millennial generation, 56 percent, know and refer to the airport as Reagan or Reagan National, while only 27 percent call the airport National.

Washington Post/Express Poll

Washington Post/Express Poll

 

The Post notes that:

Reagan’s firing of 11,000 striking air traffic controllers in 1981 may also be why neither pilots nor air traffic controllers seem to use the airport’s proper name. When talking to pilots, air traffic controllers say DCA or National, says Federal Aviation Administration spokeswoman Laura Brown, who didn’t speculate as to why that is. Pilots tend to say “Washington Tower” or “National Tower.” (You can listen in at liveatc.net.)

The Republicans, who held a majority in the House and Senate, passed the bill creating the name change in 1998, which President Bill Clinton signed into law despite fairly strong Democrat opposition on Capitol Hill.

The Post asked Clinton’s former White House press secretary, Mike McCurry, why the president did not veto the bill; and he answered: “My memory is that in February 1998, we were rather occupied at the White House with a young lady named Monica. I have faint memories of this being a big deal on Capitol Hill, but I think we pretty much stayed out of it.”

A Gallup survey found that Reagan left office as one of the most popular presidents in modern history, with a 63 percent approval rating in December of 1988. He won his first term as president with the help of 44 of the 50 states, and won re-election with 49 states. His actions as president are credited with helping to win the Cold War and reviving an ailing United States economy; unemployment dropped from 10 to 5 percent.

h/t: The Federalist Papers Project

Photo credit: Gage Skidmore (Creative Commons)

This post originally appeared on Western Journalism – Informing And Equipping Americans Who Love Freedom