Santorum: Should Gay Printing Shops Be Forced To Print ‘God Hates F—s’ Signs For Westboro Baptist Under New Law?

Rick Santorum

Joining CBS News’ Face the Nation on Sunday, former Sen. Rick Santorum, R-Pa., came out swinging against opponents of recent religious freedom laws, saying that “tolerance is a two-way street.”

Indiana and Arkansas recently have come under fire for their religious freedom laws, intended to protect businesses from being forced to provide services for activities they don’t agree with.

Santorum discussed the differences between discriminating against a single person because of sexual orientation or their race, and a business declining to provide services because an activity is against their religious faith.

“If you’re a print shop and you are a gay man, should you be forced to print, ‘God hates f—s’ for the Westboro Baptist Church because they hold those signs up?” Santorum asked. “Should the government force you to do that?”

While Santorum argued that businesses shouldn’t discriminate against people, he acknowledged that those businesses should be able to refuse services when they feel their religious beliefs are threatened.

“This is where I think we just need some space to say, ‘Let’s have some tolerance and be a two-way street,” Santorum said.

He went on to add that with the spread of the homosexual movement, there a;sp needs to be a “two-way street” in which “respecting people on both sides of the issue” can take place.

h/t: TheBlaze

This post originally appeared on Western Journalism – Informing And Equipping Americans Who Love Freedom

The GOP’s Liberty Problem

FRONT ROYAL, VA — Long ago, Pennsylvania Senator Rick Santorum won the admiration of conservatives for his unstinting support of human life. His memorable speeches in opposition to partial-birth abortion on the Senate floor flummoxed liberals while they firmly established his reputation as the go-to guy for pro-life issues.

While GOP insiders and neocons are famous for betraying pro-lifers when the elections are over, Santorum never has. And yet, rather than taking a wary approach to RoveWorld’s Hot Tub Connivers, Santorum earnestly supports the GOP Establishment’s expansive foreign policy and celebrates the mantra of the neocon calling card, “American Exceptionalism.”

“I am not a libertarian,” Santorum told a press conference in June 2011, “and I fight very strongly against libertarian influence in the Republican Party and the conservative movement.”

“I’ve got some real concerns about this movement within the Republican Party and the Tea Party Movement to sort of refashion conservatism, and I will vocally and publicly oppose it.”

In the 2012 primary debate on foreign policy, Santorum joined virtually all the other candidates in advocating more American wars: Mitt Romney. Rick Perry, Michelle Bachman, and Newt Gingrich all had their favorite targets (usually Iran or Syria); but Santorum one-upped them all when he actually threatened to go to war with China.

Is that what makes America “exceptional”?

Ironically, that debate was held in Washington’s Constitution Hall; ­yet only one candidate mentioned the Constitution, or its requirement for a congressional Declaration of War for such actions.

Santorum directed most of his fire that night at that lone constitutionalist, Rep. Ron Paul, whose defense of the Constitution had garnered significant support. He specifically criticized George W. Bush’s invasion and occupation of Iraq, which everyone else on the stage had supported.

So it is no surprise that Santorum took the opportunity last week to attack Rep. Paul’s son, Senator Rand Paul of Kentucky.

According to the Daily Caller, Santorum ducked when CNN Crossfire host Van Jones asked him if he would support Senator Paul if he were the GOP presidential nominee in 2016.

“I don¹t think that will happen, because the Republican Party is not a libertarian party, it is a conservative party,” he said. “And it will nominate a conservative, and not a libertarian.”

Well, this nagging hostility has a long pedigree. When Santorum was still in Kindergarten, Pennsylvania Governor Bill Scranton was busy trying to derail the surging presidential campaign of Barry Goldwater, who had pledged to “enforce the Constitution and restore the Republic.”

In fact, in his Conscience of a Conservative (1960), Goldwater insisted that the “first duty [of] public officials is to divest themselves of the power they have been given.”

The foreign policy battle between “isolationists” and “warmongers” has been going on for a long time in America. It is only recently, however, that the GOP establishment has switched sides to embrace the pro-war mantle.

Santorum’s attack so early on indicates that the GOP establishment is worried indeed about its Tea Party (and yes, its libertarian) base. That Santorum should side with the party’s establishment, after its serial betrayals of conservatives, libertarians, the Tea Party, and especially the pro-life, pro-family forces, tells us more about Santorum’s problems than those of the senator from Kentucky.

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The views expressed in this opinion article are solely those of their author and are not necessarily either shared or endorsed by WesternJournalism.com.

This post originally appeared on Western Journalism – Informing And Equipping Americans Who Love Freedom

Rick Santorum Dismisses Rand Paul, Pushes for Higher Minimum Wage

Former Sen. Rick Santorum appeared on CNN’s Crossfire on May, 5, 2014, to talk about Rand Paul as the potential leader of the Republican Party and the prospect of raising the minimum wage.

This post originally appeared on Western Journalism – Informing And Equipping Americans Who Love Freedom

Why Republicans Are Abandoning The GOP

Republican Elephant SC Why Republicans are Abandoning the GOP
While the topic of conservatives potentially abandoning the Republican Party remains on the front burner, a new study has been released that explains why some have already bolted.
The study, commissioned by a conservative market research group, applied “scientific methods of qualitative research” to find out why some Republican-leaning voters are abandoning the GOP. For example, Mitt Romney last year turned out fewer whites, Catholics, and evangelicals than even John McCain did in 2008, and did worse with Mormon voters than George W. Bush did in 2004. To compensate for the loss of a sizable chunk of his base and win the election, Romney would’ve needed an unattainable 72% of that Hispanic vote currently getting so much attention.

After researching a sample of disaffected Republican voters, the study drew four conclusions that were strangely missing from RNC Chairman Reince Priebus’ much-hyped “autopsy” that basically any MSNBC commentator could’ve written. I’m sure it was just an accidental oversight on Reince’s part.

1) Voters are tired of “voting for the lesser of two evils.” This was actually true of both conservatives and moderates. These voters were no longer persuaded that supporting a bad Republican candidate over any Democrat was the right thing to do.

2) Voters lost hope in the Republican Party and believe the party can no longer deliver on its promises because its leaders lack courage and integrity. According to Anne Sorock, the author of the study’s conclusive report, “the lack of perceived leadership by principle was strongly connected to this sense of loss.”

3) Voters now preferred what the report described as an “affiliation with a new community” that would pursue its principles – which was primarily the Tea Party.

4) Voters feel what the report characterized as a “perceived betrayal by the GOP establishment.” Specifically, Sorock says that when party leaders attacked a candidate they liked, these disaffected Republican voters across the ideological spectrum took it as a personal slight and felt that they weren’t welcome in the party.

To bring these crucial base voters back into the fold, the report concluded that Republicans should “strive to create a community around shared principles” rather than attacking grassroots candidates with “lesser of two evil” (i.e. electability) arguments.” The report went on to say that the GOP’s problems are not only, or even primarily, philosophical but with the party’s leadership itself.

That is spot on if you ask me.

For years, I believed the divide in the party was conservatives versus moderates. Then I thought it was social conservatives versus fiscal conservatives. Then I thought it was conservatives versus libertarians.

Then I realized that’s all a distraction.

The divide in the party isn’t ideological at all – it’s based purely on control. All the ideological debates among us are intended to keep us distracted from the real problem. Oh sure, I disagree with libertarians and other conservatives all the time. But out here in the grassroots, we actually agree on the primary purpose of the Republican Party—to advance the general principles in the party platform and offer the country a stark contrast to the statism offered by the Democrats.

However, there are those like Karl Rove who would rather lose elections than lose control of the party, and they’re against anyone who threatens their power base by empowering the grassroots. So they don’t like Ron Paul, Mike Huckabee, Rick Santorum, Newt Gingrich, or even a moderate like Rudy Giuliani when they run for president. Despite the fact all of these men have various issue and ideological differences. That’s also why they despise grassroots champions like Sarah Palin and barely tolerate conservative talk radio.

They understand that an empowered grassroots threatens their control of the party apparatus, and they need control of the party apparatus because there’s no more room at the Democrat Party Inn. So if they’re going to use gangster government to line their own and their crony capitalist buddies’ pockets, they’ve got to reverse the jersey and control Team GOP instead.

I don’t agree with a Giuliani-type moderate on a whole host of issues. In a national primary, I would work hard to beat him (and did). But while he’s my ideological opponent, he’s not my political enemy. A Giuliani would actually take the fight to the Democrats on an issue or two—like defeating radical Islam, for example. A Giuliani-type moderate may philosophically disagree with you on lots of other things, but he sees himself as part of a broader coalition. Therefore, he’s not going to use the party apparatus to thin his own herd, like the Romulans tried to do at the rules committee prior to the convention last year.

The GOP ruling class believes in nothing but themselves, which is why they’re more ruthless in primaries against their fellow Republican than they are in general elections against Democrats. This also explains why they’re hemorrhaging their own voters, and why they just don’t seem to care about it as they allegedly pursue all voters except those who might actually vote for them. It’s why they lie, shamelessly repeat often-debunked fallacies, and are more comfortable talking to George Stephanopoulos than they are talking to you.

These people would rather lose elections than lose control of the party, so they’ll ignore studies like this. They want you to stick around, provided you shut your hole and know your role—which is to shut up and vote for their approved candidates.

If you threaten to leave the party, they pay it no mind because you’re just a booty call to them. It’s not like they’re in this for any higher calling like preserving freedom and liberty. They’re flat-out gangsters, and gangsters produce gangster government like TARP and scamnesty.

You can’t affiliate, partner, or reason with gangsters like this. You either replace them or start your own gang.

 

(You can friend “Steve Deace” on Facebook or follow him on Twitter @SteveDeaceShow)

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