These Presidential Candidates Just Did Something Unbelievable For The Families Of Charleston Shooting Victims

Several Republican presidential candidates will be returning campaign contributions made by a man who runs an organization that allegedly inspired the shooting at Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church in Charleston, S.C.

Earl Holt, president of the white supremacist group Council of Conservative Citizens (CoCC), has donated $65,000 to Republican campaigns in recent years, The Guardian reported. The New York Times reveals the connection between Holt and Dylann Roof, who has been charged with the murder of nine people at Emanuel AME and could face the death penalty.

A manifesto that appeared on a website registered to Mr. Roof said that the manifesto’s author had first learned of ‘brutal black-on-white murders’ from the Council of Conservative Citizens’ website.

Donations made by Holt include $8,500 to Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas; $1,750 to RandPAC, the political action committee of Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky.; and $1,500 to former Sen. Rick Santorum, R-Pa. Bloomberg reported $3,000 was donated by Holt to the nascent campaign of Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker.

All of the above candidates, declared or otherwise, plan on returning money they received from Holt.

“RandPAC is donating the funds to the Mother Emanuel Hope Fund to assist the victims’ families,” said Paul spokesman Doug Stafford, according to Bloomberg. Santorum spokesman Matthew Beynon told The Guardian Monday that his boss would be doing the same. “Senator Santorum does not condone or respect racist or hateful comments of any kind. Period. The views the Senator campaigns on are his own and he is focused on uniting America, not dividing he,” Beynon said.

Catherine Frazier, a spokeswoman for Cruz, told Bloomberg that her boss “believes that there is no place for racism in society.”

“Upon learning about Mr. Holt’s background and his contributions to the campaign, he immediately instructed that all of those donations be returned.”

AshLee Strong, a spokeswoman for Walker, said the governor would be donating the funds to charity, according to Bloomberg.

h/t: Youth for Rand Paul

Do you applaud these candidates? Share your thoughts in the comments section below.

This post originally appeared on Western Journalism – Equipping You With The Truth

Here Are Liberal Media’s Top 10 Worst Attacks On This 2016 Presidential Candidate

Rick Santorum has once again thrown his hat into the presidential ring. One might agree that the former senator from Pennsylvania will have his work cut out for him, especially if the liberal media has anything to say about it.

In 2012, after a surprising win in the Iowa Caucus and some other primaries, Santorum went on to come in a distant second to Mitt Romney for the GOP nomination.

A Real Clear Average of polls currently has him running twelfth among the announced and likely candidates that make up the 2016 Republican field, polling at 1.7 percent.

Santorum’s numbers will probably rise now that he has announced; however, if he gains any traction, he is sure to face harsh, even outlandish attacks, from the media, if history is a guide.

Here are some of the attacks the candidate faced in the past, many of which were chronicled by the conservative Media Research Center.

1. In 2012, New York Times executive editor Bill Keller likened Santorum’s Catholic faith to sharia law, saying: “Remember earlier in the campaign when Newt Gingrich was worrying everybody about Sharia law: the Muslims were going to impose Sharia law in America? Sometimes Santorum sounds like he’s creeping up on a Christian version of Sharia law.”

2. In 2008, then-chief Newsweek Washington correspondent Evan Thomas said: “[Sen. Rick] Santorum’s theatrics make me gag. He may be sincere, but the show that he just put on, the clip we just saw of him wringing his hands about babies, make me think that it is theater.

3. This week, Rolling Stone went after Santorum for pointing out one of the unintended consequences of the tens of millions of abortions over the last four decades: a major imbalance in funding Social Security. He stated: “The social security system in my opinion is a flawed design, period. But, having said that, the design would work a lot better if we had stable demographic trends….The reason social security is in big trouble is we don’t have enough workers to support the retirees. Well, a third of all the young people in America are not in America today because of abortion, because one in three pregnancies end in abortion.”

4. Also, Rolling Stone called Santorum’s view that Planned Parenthood should not receive federal funding “vile.” “I can’t imagine any other organization with its roots as poisonous as the roots of Planned Parenthood getting federal funding of any kind. This is an organization that was founded on the eugenics movement, founded on racism. It’s origins are horrific. You can say well, it’s not that anymore. It’s not far from where it was in my opinion in its activities and its motivations,” Santorum said.

5. This week, the Washington Post, in an article entitled Seven Reasons Why Santorum Will Lose, listed number 1 as “Satan” and linked to a Huffington Post article from 2012. In it, the candidate defended remarks he’d made in 2008 regarding America being in a spiritual war. “Satan has his sights on the United States of America!” he said. “Satan is attacking the great institutions of America, using those great vices of pride, vanity, and sensuality as the root to attack all of the strong plants that has so deeply rooted in the American tradition…This is a spiritual war…If you were Satan, who would you go after in this day an age” other than the United States? When questioned about it in 2012, he said, “I‘m a person of faith. I believe in good and evil.”

6. In 2011, Matt Lauer, while interviewing Santorum on NBC’s The Today Show, said “some” are calling him ultra-conservative on the social issues, to which the candidate took exception. He responded: “I believe life begins at conception, and I believe marriage is between a man and woman. And I think the law should reflect that…if that makes me ultra conservative, so be it.”

7. In 2011, New York Times Executive Editor Keller likened candidates, including Santorum, who profess a Christian faith to believing in space aliens: “If a candidate for President said he believed that space aliens dwell among us, would that affect your willingness to vote for him?…Rick Perry, Michele Bachmann and Rick Santorum are all affiliated with fervid subsets of evangelical Christianity, which has raised concerns about their respect for the separation of church and state, not to mention the separation of fact and fiction.” The Times later corrected the piece, noting Santorum is a Catholic, not an evangelical.

8. In 2012, the since-disgraced MSNBC host Martin Bashir labeled Santorum Orwellian. “When we last saw the Republican front-runner Rick Santorum speaking before a crowd yesterday, all we could think of was George Orwell’s novel 1984 about a society dominated by the most extreme form of totalitarianism….In reviewing his book, It Takes a Family, one critic said, ‘Mr. Santorum has one of the finest minds of the 13th century.’ But I’m not so sure. If you listen carefully to Rick Santorum, he sounds more like Stalin than Pope Innocent III.”

9. In 2012, The Economist’s Zanny Minton Beddoes said the former senator wants to take the United States back to the 13th Century: “The fact that you say that you think he might win the nomination completely terrifies me. I mean, how many decades back, how many centuries back does he want to take us? I read a little bit of his book this week, which is terrifying — logical, but terrifying — and there was a review of it, I think it was the Philadelphia Inquirer when it first came out and it said that Santorum would be a fine mind for the 13th century. And it’s kind of right. It’s logical, it’s natural law, it’s the kind of Catholic absolutist view of the world of several centuries ago.”

10. In 2012, CNN’s Bob Franken said Santorum wants to institute an Iran-like theocracy. “You then have Rick Santorum representing the theocrats and the Republican party, which is also part of the base, theocracy, of course, like perhaps the one in Iran, they would like to see that created here. This is really an appeal to the base instincts in the Republican party, and the base instincts of the Republican base.”

Republican candidates have consistently faced biased media coverage in the past, but many may think the media noise threshold Santorum will have to cross will be greater.

The views expressed in this opinion article are solely those of their author and are not necessarily either shared or endorsed by WesternJournalism.com.

This post originally appeared on Western Journalism – Equipping You With The Truth

A New Contender Is Jumping Into The 2016 GOP Race – And He Could Have An Advantage Over His Opponents

Former Pennsylvania Rep. Rick Santorum broke his silence regarding a 2016 presidential run in a fundraising email sent to supporters Wednesday.

“This afternoon,” he wrote, “I will formally announce my candidacy for President of the United States!”

Subsequent media reports indicate ABC’s George Stephanopoulos will interview the newly minted candidate in an exclusive presentation Wednesday afternoon.

Santorum – whose strong showing in the 2012 Republican nomination process might give him an edge over some of his fellow candidates – has been hinting at a follow-up White House bid for months.

In 2014, he pointed out that, despite a second-place primary finish just two years prior, he was not on the short list of likely 2016 nominees among many political insiders.

“America loves an underdog,” he affirmed. “We’re definitely the underdog in this race.”

His underdog status seems to have persisted into 2015. A look at recent polling data shows Santorum languishing at the bottom of the Republican list with roughly two percent of respondents expressing support for his candidacy. Furthermore, at least one prominent family that endorsed him in 2012 has switched allegiance ahead of the 2016 race.

The Duggar family, embattled stars of the TLC program 19 Kids and Counting, announced they will back Mike Huckabee in the Republican primary.

Of course, primary season is just getting started; and Santorum has heretofore not even been an official candidate. As ABC News’ Ben Gittleson pointed out, the last two Republican presidential nominees – John McCain and Mitt Romney – were only able to snag a primary win during their second attempt.

Does Rick Santorum stand a chance in the crowded Republican primary race? Share your thoughts in the comments section below.

This post originally appeared on Western Journalism – Equipping You With The Truth

Duggars Announce Their Pick For 2016

The Duggar family rose to fame after signing on to star in the hit reality series 19 Kids and Counting; however, the clan is no longer celebrated solely for its sheer size. By voicing strong biblical values and traditional beliefs, the Duggars have gained a loyal following among evangelical Christians.

As the 2016 presidential election cycle progresses, the influence of cultural figures like the Duggars could play a role in deciding the ultimate nominees. According to recent reports, parents Jim Bob and Michelle Duggar have already picked their favorite from among the crop of Republican hopefuls.

After endorsing outspoken social conservative Rick Santorum in 2012, the couple announced they are supporting former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee – an ordained Baptist preacher – this time around.

Huckabee, who announced his candidacy earlier this week, is a “man of faith” and “very wise,” according to Michelle Duggar.

She went on to declare that he will “help get our nation back on track” in an endorsement posted to the candidate’s official website.

The family’s patriarch offered a glowing review, too, insisting that the nation “needs Governor Huckabee for president!”

In addition to having the “communication skills of Ronald Reagan,” Jim Bob Duggar touted Huckabee’s “common sense business approach to government.”

As Western Journalism has previously reported, Huckabee – who won the Iowa caucuses during his 2008 White House bid – is on pace to give his fellow Republican candidates a run for their money. The Wickers Group recently looked at the results from 11 recent polls, determining Huckabee is “extremely well-positioned to launch a winning campaign for the Republican nomination for President.”

Would you support a candidate with strong Christian values? Let us know in the comments section below.

This post originally appeared on Western Journalism – Equipping You With The Truth

Santorum: Should Gay Printing Shops Be Forced To Print ‘God Hates F—s’ Signs For Westboro Baptist Under New Law?

Rick Santorum

Joining CBS News’ Face the Nation on Sunday, former Sen. Rick Santorum, R-Pa., came out swinging against opponents of recent religious freedom laws, saying that “tolerance is a two-way street.”

Indiana and Arkansas recently have come under fire for their religious freedom laws, intended to protect businesses from being forced to provide services for activities they don’t agree with.

Santorum discussed the differences between discriminating against a single person because of sexual orientation or their race, and a business declining to provide services because an activity is against their religious faith.

“If you’re a print shop and you are a gay man, should you be forced to print, ‘God hates f—s’ for the Westboro Baptist Church because they hold those signs up?” Santorum asked. “Should the government force you to do that?”

While Santorum argued that businesses shouldn’t discriminate against people, he acknowledged that those businesses should be able to refuse services when they feel their religious beliefs are threatened.

“This is where I think we just need some space to say, ‘Let’s have some tolerance and be a two-way street,” Santorum said.

He went on to add that with the spread of the homosexual movement, there a;sp needs to be a “two-way street” in which “respecting people on both sides of the issue” can take place.

h/t: TheBlaze

This post originally appeared on Western Journalism – Informing And Equipping Americans Who Love Freedom