Obama’s Chief of Staff Says, Impeach My Boss (A Cato Institute Scholar Agrees)

Ben Johnson, The White House Watch

President Obama’s luck got so bad during the debate over raising the debt ceiling that even his chief of staff said he could be impeached. On July 27, the Cato Institute‘s director of health policy studies Michael F. Cannon heard Bill Daley admit, in not so many words, that it’s okay to impeach Obama:

On NPR this morning, I heard White House chief of staff Bill Daley say, “The president cannot usurp the power that’s in the Congress.” What a relief! Also, this:

I don’t think the American people would find it appropriate for the president of the United States to defy the laws of the nation and its Constitution, without their belief that that president should be impeached. And this president isn’t going to do anything against the Constitution, against the laws of the United States of America.

So if the president were to defy, say, the War Powers Resolution by ridiculously redefining “hostilities,” or if he were to defy the Constitution by signing a law that claims for Congress a power the Constitution does not grant (say, ObamaCare), we should impeach him. Got it.

If Bill Daley — a scion of the Chicago Daleys — opaquely allows that the president is so corrupt he could be impeached, why are the Republicans so timid about following through? It would be a shame if his only good piece of advice went unheeded.

Click here to sign the petition to impeach Obama. Click here to learn more about the Impeach Obama Campaign.

Obama Faith Adviser, and Ayers’ Friend: American Freedom and Justice are “Myths”

Aaron Klein, WND.com

Obama's faith adviser, Eboo Patel

President Obama’s faith adviser, Eboo Patel, blasted what he called the “myths” of America – describing them as beliefs that the country is “a land of freedom and equality and justice.”

Patel explained how he used the “faith-based movement” to channel his rage at America “in a direction far more compassionate and far more merciful.”

Patel, a Muslim activist from Chicago, further implied that had he grown up in the 1960s, he may have joined the Weather Underground terrorist group led by William Ayers.

Like Obama, Patel is deeply tied to Ayers, WND has learned.

In February 2010, Obama named Patel to his Advisory Council on Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships.

Patel is the founder and executive director of Chicago-based Interfaith Youth Core, which says it promotes pluralism by teaming people of different faiths on service projects.

In a 2007 interview with NPR to promote a book he wrote that year, Patel was asked about his “affinity” toward the radicalism of Ayers, as described in the book.

Patel replied that his own life story “is much closer to Bill Ayers,” explaining he “grew up in the same hometown” that Ayers did.

Continued Patel: “I was kind of taught the same myths about America, a land of freedom and equality and justice, et cetera, et cetera.”

“And then, when I got to college, I saw people eating out of garbage cans for dinner, and I saw Vietnam vets drinking mouthwash for the alcohol, and I thought to myself, this is not the myth that I grew up with. And, in a way, I was so, I think, immature at that time politically, that all I could do was rage.”

Patel explained how he used religion to channel his rage toward America:

“And it was a faith-based movement that came into my life that kind of directed that rage in a direction far more compassionate and far more merciful.”

Obama’s faith adviser went on to say how he may have joined Ayers’ terrorist group if he was around as an activist in the 1960s.

“One of the things that I write about in this book is, you know, had it been one of the people involved in the Weather Underground, who were sitting at my kitchen table when I was 18 years old and raging, my life could have been very different,” he said.

“That I really thank God that it was a set of people who came into my life with a very clear vision of justice. But a sense of justice emanating from Divine Mercy.”

Patel has a much deeper relationship with Ayers than he admitted in the NPR interview.

In 2005, he co-authored a book with Ayers’ adopted son, Chesa Boudin.

The book, Letters from Young Activists: Today’s Rebels Speak Out, was co-written by several young radicals, including Ismail Khalidi, the son of Columbia University Professor Rashid Khalidi.

The Tea Party vs. NPR

Dr. Paul Kengor, FloydReports.com

“The current Republican Party, particularly the Tea Party, is fanatically involved in people’s personal lives and very fundamental Christian,” said NPR’s Ron Schiller to two undercover reporters. “I wouldn’t even call it Christian; it’s this weird evangelical kind of [movement].”

Not knowing he was being videoed, Schiller continued: “The current Republican Party is not really the Republican Party, it’s been hijacked by this group; that is, not just Islamo-phobic but really xenophobic. I mean, basically, they are, they believe in sort of white, middle-American, gun toting—I mean, it’s scary. They’re seriously racist, racist people.” (Click here for transcript and here for video.)

Schiller is being heavily criticized for these comments, as is NPR and elite liberal thinking in general. Schiller, NPR Foundation president and vice president for development (until these comments), is the Left’s latest exhibit in smearing the Tea Party movement as bigots, racists, fascists, Hitler-ites, followers of Attila the Hun, Torquemada, Genghis Khan, or whatever other handy demon.

Yet, what’s telling about Schiller’s comments is their lack of factual basis, an even greater sin from a man whose business, and erstwhile employer, is the reporting of facts. His comments are a PR problem for NPR, furthering the perception that NPR is not about unbiased reporting but primarily about opinion—a leftist opinion camouflaged as objective news.

As evidence for my perspective, I’d like to share some statistical information on the Tea Party movement. This information was widely published and is easily available to anyone, least of all a major news organization like NPR.

In March 2010, Gallup did a comprehensive survey of the Tea Party (click here). Gallup is the most respected polling firm on the planet, and not conservative. The headline Gallup chose to highlight its study speaks for itself, “Tea Partiers Are Fairly Mainstream in Their Demographics.”

Read more.

Cartoon of the Day: What NPR Should Stand For

NPR Head Ousted After Hateful Video is Released

Jennifer Harper, The Washington Times

National Public Radio President and CEO Vivian Schiller has resigned, the public broadcaster said Wednesday, a day after the release of an undercover video sting showing a former top NPR executive villifying grass-roots conservatives and questioning the need for continued federal funding for the organization.

According to initial reports from David Folkenflik, NPR’s own media reporter, Mrs. Schiller was “ousted” from her position by management.

“To repeat, CEO Vivian Schiller has been forced out by the board,” Mr. Folkenflik said in a tweet within minutes of the public announcement.

The resignation is “effective immediately,” NPR board of directors Chairman Dave Edwards said to its staff and member stations, also announcing that Joyce Slocum, senior vice president of legal affairs and general counsel, has been appointed to the position of interim CEO. A search is already under way for a permanent replacement.

Read more.