Here Are The 2 GOP Presidential Candidates Who Skipped This Critical Vote On Planned Parenthood

Two Republican presidential contenders failed to show up for a crucial U.S. Senate vote that could have derailed budget funding for Planned Parenthood.

Senators Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) and Lindsey Graham (R-SC) were no shows Sept. 28 for the vote on cloture, which limits further debate on the budget bill. Senate Majority Leader Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) can now move his Continuing Resolution ahead. That resolution would extend funding the government until Dec. 11.

The cloture vote was 77-19. Invoking cloture requires 60 votes, so if 41 senators had voted against cloture, there could have been ongoing debate and filibuster. That could have pushed the budget past important deadlines and shut the government down. Some, like Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas), said they would seek a government shutdown if the $500 million in funding for the non-profit organization stayed in the budget. Cruz and another Republican presidential hopeful, Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) voted “no” to cloture.

Planned Parenthood is facing scrutiny in a congressional investigation regarding selling fetal organs from abortions. The organization was the target in an undercover investigation from the Center of Medical Progress where Planned Parenthood officials and others openly talked about pricing parts from late-term babies.

With a cloture vote passing by a wide margin of vote, Rubio and Graham would not have made much of a difference in the final count. Critics argue that Rubio could have influenced other Republicans to add to the conservative ballots.

Rubio is now under fire from political pundits for not taking a stand at all, stating the absence was political in that he can claim a pro-life stance without taking a controversial stand that could end with a government shutdown. The Florida senator said Democrats are the real culprits in government shutdown threats. “No one can tell me that Planned Parenthood–funding Planned Parenthood as an organization is such a high priority that we have to do it, otherwise we won’t fund government,” he said. “That’s absurd.”

Rubio has also faced criticism from GOP presidential front-runner Donald Trump regarding his ongoing absenteeism from the Senate. Trump said Rubio has the worst attendance record of all.

“That means he’s either a not hard worker or he’s maybe even something worse than that. But what you’re supposed to do if you’re elected, you’re supposed to be voting. There’s no excuses for that,” Trump said in a recent interview.

Graham, who has advocated a pro-life stance, skipped the vote to campaign. He said he wants to defund Planned Parenthood, but is against a government shutdown. Graham said he wouldn’t go back to Washington, D.C. to vote for a shutdown, so he opted not to go at all.

“Anybody that wants to shut down the government is shutting down the ability to stop the next attack, which I think is coming if we don’t do something differently,” he said.

The South Carolina senator said he thinks the federal government should stop funding the abortion provider given new information shown in the secretly taped videos.

“Let me just be clear about me and Planned Parenthood. If I were president, I would never submit a budget with one dime for Planned Parenthood,” Graham said.

A continuing resolution that would have temporarily funded the government while freezing Planned Parenthood funding for one year failed to pass the Senate on Sept. 24 in a 47-53 vote. Sixty votes would have pushed the resolution through, but eight Republicans sided with Democrats out of fear such a move would have ended with a government shutdown in a stalemate with Democrats. President Barack Obama said he would veto any measure that didn’t include Planned Parenthood funding.

Senator Graham, All Unborn Children Have Value

Speaking on the US Senate Floor for the Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act, US Senator Lindsey Graham of South Carolina said, “All I’m asking is just don’t crush that baby’s skull unless there’s a very good reason.”  

While I agree with parts of Graham’s bill, the Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act, which would ban abortion after 20 weeks since babies can feel pain at this stage, I do not agree with the fact that it has exceptions for abortions, and I cannot agree with his statement. According to Senator Graham, good reasons for an abortion exception include endangerment of the mother’s life, and if the pregnancy is the result of abuse. In my opinion, however, there is absolutely no good reason to crush an infant’s skull.

Let me put it this way. In the first reason, if you risk the mother, there is only a chance that death could occur. But if you perform an abortion, there is absolutely no way around it; that baby is going to die.  

In the second reason, exception for sexual abuse, is it right to kill a child just because its life started violently? Are not all men created equal, and endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights, that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness?  Jeremiah 1:5 says: “Before I formed you in the womb I knew you, before you were born I set you apart.” None of these exceptions are good reasons at all.

Retired Southern Baptist pastor and former Arkansas Governor Mike Huckabee said that “Every human life has value because it is the creation of the hands of a holy God.”

I believe that we need to end abortion in its entirety and do it soon. We are the voice for the voiceless and must stand up for every human life, not just one here and one there. America has to get off the tracks because as the song goes, “There’s a long black train comin’ down the line.” Hell exists, and we can’t pretend it doesn’t.


Learn more about your Constitution with Mason Chandler and the “Institute on the Constitution” and receive your free gift.

The views expressed in this opinion article are solely those of their author and are not necessarily either shared or endorsed by

Republican Candidates Advise GOP Field Not To Attack Own Party

Republican presidential hopeful Ted Cruz recently defended rival Donald Trump against the intraparty jabs he’s sustained since announcing his candidacy.

Senator Cruz said in an interview with Politico:

I would … note that an awful lot of Republicans, including other Republican candidates, have gone out of their way to smack Donald Trump with a stick. Now I think that’s just foolish.

After Mr. Trump’s successful rally in Phoenix, Senator John McCain called the thousands of Trump supporters “crazies.”

Senator Cruz remarked:

When you attack and vilify the people at that rally as crazies, it does nothing to help Republicans win in 2016.

Senator McCain’s comments triggered this response from Mr. Trump.


Trump: He’s not a war hero.

Mod: He’s a war hero.

Trump: He’s a war hero.

Mod: Five-and-a-half years…

Trump: He’s a war hero ’cause he was captured. I like people that weren’t captured. Okay, I hate to tell you.

Senator Lindsey Graham attacked Mr. Trump for his comments about McCain’s war record.


Graham: And you’re slandering anybody and everybody to stay in the news. You know, run for president. But don’t be the world’s biggest jackass.

Similar to McCain, Trump responded with an even bigger stick


Trump: And he gave me his number. And I found the card. I wrote the number down, I don’t know if it’s the right number, let’s try it. 202…

Despite the attacks from the Republican Party, Trump’s poll numbers continue to surge

Chuck Todd Meet The Press clip

Todd: Where does the race stand right now? Donald Trump sticking right there with his 1 in 5 support. Nearly 1 in 4 now, of Republican voters. 23 percent.

Governor Mike Huckabee went on to share his concern that, upon the selection of his party’s presidential candidate, “that person is so bitterly wounded that it becomes quite easy for the Democrat to step over his bloodied carcass and take the victory.”

Can Republican infighting damage the party’s 2016 chances? Share your thoughts in the comments section below.

This post originally appeared on Western Journalism - Equipping You With The Truth

Here’s What Huckabee Thinks Of The Republicans Who Are Attacking Trump

Celebrating some positive movement in the polls following his performance in Thursday’s debate, Republican presidential candidate Mike Huckabee shared some advice for his fellow primary contestants as the 2016 election season shifts into high gear.

Though he did not mention any candidate specifically, Huckabee warned of the damage incendiary infighting could inflict on his party’s chances of reclaiming the White House. Of course, much of the intraparty spear-throwing thus far has been aimed at front-runner Donald Trump.

As Western Journalism has previously reported, GOP candidates including Marco Rubio and Lindsey Graham have skewered the brash billionaire for his unconventional rhetoric. Trump’s polling numbers, however, show his message resonates with a significant portion of the Republican Party.

Intentionally denigrating any candidate who might go on to win the party’s nomination, Huckabee warned, could have far-reaching implications.

“You will not hear that from me,” he said during a recent campaign stop in Iowa. “I believe that, quite frankly, we’re all trying out to be the quarterback of the Republican team. My attitude is that I want to get the job because I played a better game, not because I broke the legs of all the other people who are playing the game.”

He went on to share his concern that, upon the selection of his party’s presidential candidate, “that person is so bitterly wounded that it becomes quite easy for the Democrat to step over his bloodied carcass and take the victory.”

Though the barbs have generally flown in both directions, some of the latest Republican criticism of Trump has focused on his war of words with Fox News host and debate moderator Megyn Kelly.

Jeb Bush, for example, described his remarks as “wrong” during a speech at an event Saturday.

“This is not how we win elections,” he maintained, “and worse yet, that is not how you bring people together to solve problems. Mr. Trump ought to apologize.”

Can GOP infighting hurt the eventual nominee’s chances in a general election? Share your thoughts in the comments section below.

This post originally appeared on Western Journalism – Equipping You With The Truth

What Fox News Just Did Is A Game Changer For The Republican Presidential Field

There’s been a ton of speculation recently about which GOP candidates would make the cut for the first presidential debate to be hosted by Fox News on August 6. Some have even wondered whether certain candidates have tried to up their game and increase their chances by sharpening their rhetoric — witness Lindsey Graham’s repeated shots at Donald Trump, referring to him as a “wrecking ball” who is “selling fear and prejudice.”

Now, thanks to a big change just announced by Fox News, Graham and other low-ranking Republican contenders for the nomination will have a chance to make their case on TV in just about a week. Politico reports that the cable network will have an early debate that’s open to all contenders who haven’t polled high enough to qualify for the prime-time event.

“The change amounts to an insurance policy for candidates who were in danger of being disqualified from the vital first debate based on low polls — Carly Fiorina, former New York Gov. George Pataki and Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.).” Politico notes that this change means all 16 announced candidates will get important TV time on the debate stage in Cleveland. Based on current polling, former Sen. Rick Santorum, former Texas Gov. Rick Perry, and Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal would also be in the lower-tier of debaters appearing in the earlier time slot on Fox News.

Prior to the rules change, the network was reserving the stage for only those candidates tallying at least 1 percent in national preference polls.

According to a Real Clear Politics average of recent polls, the current top 10 for the Fox News prime-time debate would likely be:

Donald Trump, former Gov. Jeb Bush (Fla.), Gov. Scott Walker (Wis.), Sen. Rubio (Fla.), former Gov. Mike Huckabee (Ark.), Ben Carson, Sen. Ted Cruz (Texas), Sen. Rand Paul (Ky.), Gov. Chris Christie (N.J.), and Gov. John Kasich (Ohio).

The early debate is scheduled to last an hour, the later one closer to two hours.

This post originally appeared on Western Journalism – Equipping You With The Truth