What The CIA Just Claimed Sheds A Strange New Light On What Many Americans Think About UFOs

CIA UFO

Did you even know that the Central Intelligence Agency has a twitter feed? Well, it does, and what the CIA just tweeted could create quite a stir among UFO believers, researchers and skeptics.

No, the spy guys haven’t admitted that flying saucers are real and that government agencies have long conspired to cover up their existence. In fact, what the CIA just announced is pretty much the opposite — that at least half the supposed UFO sightings in the 1950’s could be attributed to super-secret agency activity.

The Daily Mail reports on the CIA’s claim that much of the mysterious activities people saw in the skies decades ago were really the high-altitude flights of new spy planes being tested.

The CIA explained that the UFO sightings of the past were were directly correlated to them testing U-2 spy planes at altitudes of over 60,000 feet, once thought an impossible height to fly.

And how has the CIA come to the conclusion that numerous reported sightings of alien spacecraft were really U-2 spy planes on test flights? Again, from the article at dailymail.co.uk:

UPI reports that the CIA soon realized that UFO sightings lined up with the place and time the U-2 planes were flying but that they purposefully chose not to let people know that what they were seeing were not aliens but spies.

Many people may recall that the U-2 spy plane was a Cold War aircraft developed to photograph enemy targets from extremely high altitudes. They flew out of top-secret military bases in California and Nevada, states where many of the UFO sightings were reported.

Of course, with the skepticism among many doubters as to the truth-telling habits of the CIA, this new revelation from the spy agency may simply reinforce the belief that those mysterious objects in the skies during the ’50’s really were UFOs.

 

This post originally appeared on Western Journalism – Informing And Equipping Americans Who Love Freedom

Is Government Ever Faithful To The Constitution?

Photo credit: shutterstock.com

When the government is waving at us with its right hand, so to speak, it is the government’s left hand that we should be watching. Just as a magician draws your attention to what he wants you to see so you will not observe how his trick is performed, last week presented a textbook example of public disputes masking hidden deceptions. Here is what happened.

Last week was dominated by two huge news stories. One was the revelation by the Senate Intelligence Committee of torture committed by CIA agents and contractors on 119 detainees in the post-9/11 era — 26 of whom were tortured for months by mistake. In that revelation of anguish and error were the conclusions by CIA agents themselves that their torture had not produced helpful information. President Barack Obama acknowledged that the CIA had tortured; yet he directed the Department of Justice not to prosecute those who tortured and those who authorized it.

The other substantial news story was the compromise achieved by Congress and the White House to fund the government through the end of September 2015. That legislation, which is 2,000 pages in length, was not read by anyone who voted for it. It spends a few hundred billion dollars more than the government will collect in tax revenue. The compromise was achieved through bribery; members of Congress bought and sold votes by adding goodies (in the form of local expenditures of money borrowed by the federal government) to the bill that were never debated or independently voted upon and were added solely to achieve the votes needed for passage. This is how the federal government operates today. Both parties participate in it. They have turned the public treasury into a public trough.

Hidden in the law that authorized the government to spend more than it will collect was a part about funding for the 16 federal civilian intelligence agencies. And hidden in that was a clause, inserted by the same Senate Intelligence Committee that revealed the CIA torture, authorizing the National Security Agency to gather and retain nonpublic data for five years and to share it with law enforcement and with foreign governments. “Nonpublic data” is the government’s language referring to the content of the emails, text messages, telephone calls, bank statements, utility bills, and credit card bills of nearly every innocent person in America — including members of Congress, federal judges, public officials, and law enforcement officials. I say “innocent” because the language of this legislation — which purports to make lawful the NSA spying we now all know about — makes clear that those who spy upon us needn’t have any articulable suspicion or probable cause for spying.

The need for articulable suspicion and probable cause has its origins in the Fourth Amendment to the Constitution, which was written to prohibit what Congress just authorized. That amendment was a reaction to the brutish British practice of rummaging through the homes of American colonists, looking for anything that might be illegal. It is also a codification of our natural right to privacy. It requires that if the government wants nonpublic data from our persons, houses, papers or effects, it must first present evidence of probable cause to a judge and then ask the judge for a search warrant.

Probable cause is a level of evidence that is sufficient to induce a judge into concluding that it is more likely than not that the place to be examined contains evidence of crimes. In order to seek probable cause, the government must first have an articulable suspicion about the person or place it has targeted. Were this not in the law, then nothing would stop the government from fishing expeditions in pursuit of anyone it wants to pursue. And fishing expeditions turn the presumption of liberty on its head. The presumption of liberty is based on the belief that our rights are natural to us and that we may exercise them without a permission slip from the government and without its surveillance.

Until last week, that is. Last week, Congress, by authorizing the massive NSA spying to continue and by authorizing the spies to share what they have seized with law enforcement, basically permitted the fishing expeditions that the Fourth Amendment was written to prevent.

How can the president and Congress defy the Constitution, you might ask? Hasn’t every member of the government taken an oath to uphold the Constitution? Doesn’t the Constitution create the presidency and the Congress? How can politicians purport to change it?

The answers to these questions are obvious, as is the belief of most of those in government that they can write any law and regulate any behavior and ignore the Constitution they have sworn to uphold whenever they want, so long as they can get away with it.

 
COPYRIGHT 2014 ANDREW P. NAPOLITANO
DISTRIBUTED BY CREATORS.COM

Photo credit: shutterstock.com

The views expressed in this opinion article are solely those of their author and are not necessarily either shared or endorsed by WesternJournalism.com.

This post originally appeared on Western Journalism – Informing And Equipping Americans Who Love Freedom

A Time For Torture

Photo credit: LEE SNIDER PHOTO IMAGES / Shutterstock.com

A poll released this week found 51 percent of Americans approve of the harsh interrogation tactics the CIA used immediately after the 9/11 terrorist attacks.

Imagine what those numbers would have been on Sept. 12, 2001.

The NBC/Wall Street Journal survey is in sync with the results of similar opinion polls that show a majority of Americans are not naive about what “torture” is or isn’t, or when it should be used.

About half of those polled called the CIA’s use of waterboarding, sleep deprivation, and other tough interview methods “torture”; but a majority still approved of it.

About 30 percent of Americans — most of them Democrats — told NBC they think the CIA went too far in the early days of the Bush administration. About 80 percent of Republicans approved the CIA’s tactics.

Dick Cheney got beat up this week by the liberal media, Senate Democrats, and the holier-than-thou crowd for refusing to use the word “torture” to describe the CIA’s methods of extracting information from evil people who wanted to kill us or who knew where Osama Bin Laden’s home address was.

As for the future, 45 percent of those polled say the CIA should continue to use the same interrogation tactics, while 28 percent said they should not.

Interrogating our enemies during war is a dirty business.

It’s not anything like that classy old 1950s quiz show “What’s My Line,” where a panel of well-dressed celebrities like Steve Allen had 10 questions to figure out the occupations of the mystery contestants.

“Mr. Ramzi Ahmed Yousef, did you ever mastermind a plan to blow up the World Trade Center?”

“No.”

“OK, panel. Eight down and two to go.”

I have a little story for anyone who thinks America’s rough interrogation tactics really deserve to be called “torture.”

During the mid-1980s, when I was on a vacation in Italy, my wife and I were being protected by the U.S. Secret Service and its Italian equivalent.

A few years earlier, the leftist Red Brigade had been terrorizing Italy, assassinating people, kidnapping business executives, setting off bombs, robbing banks, and blowing off people’s kneecaps as they walked down the sidewalks.

In 1981, after the Red Brigade kidnapped U.S. General James Dozier, it took Italy’s counter-terrorism agency 42 days to rescue him — without firing a shot.

I asked one of the unshaven, rugged, glass-eating Italian secret servicemen working in our motorcade detail how they finally found out where General Dozier was being held.

He told me that after his colleagues caught a few members of the Red Brigade, they were taken to the basement and interrogated.

The terrorists became very talkative after their genitals were placed in a vise.

The agents who used this persuasive technique — which also led to the capture of hundreds of Red Brigade members and put the deadly terrorist group out of business — were disciplined by their superiors.

They were suspended for five days and went to the beach.

As the Italians proved, sometimes in war you have to use “enhanced” interrogation methods to get the successful ending you want.

In 2001, we found ourselves in a bloody war against terrorists. The White House knew it. The CIA knew it. Even the media and Democrats in Congress knew it. The American people figured it out too.

What the CIA did to extract information from the Islamist terrorists was not nice, but it was not really torture.

We shouldn’t be second-guessing and beating up on the CIA, George W. Bush, Dick Cheney, and all the other men and women who’ve helped to keep us safe for the last 14 years.

We should be thanking them.

Merry Christmas.

 

Photo credit: LEE SNIDER PHOTO IMAGES / Shutterstock.com

The views expressed in this opinion article are solely those of their author and are not necessarily either shared or endorsed by WesternJournalism.com.

This post originally appeared on Western Journalism – Informing And Equipping Americans Who Love Freedom

Ex-CIA Official: Democrats Were Fully Aware Of Interrogation Methods

ex

On Fox News Sunday, Chris Wallace interviewed the former director of the National Clandestine Service of the CIA, Jose Rodriguez, who oversaw the agency’s interrogation program.  Rodriguez said that Rep. Nancy Pelosi “knew every one of our enhanced interrogations” and was briefed on specific methods like waterboarding, sleep deprivation, pushing, and slapping just after Congress’ summer break.

“We briefed her specifically on the use of the enhanced interrogation techniques on Abu Zubayda.  So she knew, back in September of 2002, every one of our enhanced interrogation techniques.”

The former CIA Director told the Fox News host:

“These people were fully aware of all of the techniques that were given to us and approved by the Office of Legal Counsel at Justice.”

Rodriguez added that Nancy Pelosi “never objected to the techniques at all.”

He said that California congresswoman Jane Harman (D) was the only person who ever objected to the CIA’s practices when she cautioned the director in 2003 that “the perception will be in the future that you did this to hide something.”

Rodriguez went on to say that Jay Rockefeller, the chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, was well-informed with the Agency’s tactics and requested specific information from the 2004 Inspector General’s report.

“So, all of these people knew exactly what we were doing.”

(h/t: Townhall)

Image credit:  Fox News Sunday screenshot

This post originally appeared on Western Journalism – Informing And Equipping Americans Who Love Freedom

WATCH: Judge Jeanine Rips Senate ‘Apologists’ Whose Actions She Calls ‘Dangerous’ To America

Picture 4

Dick Cheney wasn’t the only one who took to TV over the weekend with an impassioned defense of CIA “enhanced interrogation techniques” in the post 9/11 atmosphere of fear and apprehension about terrorist attacks on America.

On her Fox News show, Judge Jeanine Pirro cut loose with both barrels in her condemnation of the Senate Intelligence Committee report just released by Sen. Dianne Feinstein and her fellow Democrats.

Judge Jeanine blasted the Feinstein-led committee for its “obvious political gamesmanship,” taking angry aim directly at the California Democrat:

These are our enemies. Their mission is to kill us. So while their Allah says, ‘Kill the infidel,’ you and your Senate Democrats say we need to be kinder and gentler to them.

While Judge Jeanine issued her hard-hitting attack on what she called the “dangerous” actions of Feinstein and the other “apologists” in the Senate, former Vice President Cheney continued his fierce defense of harsh CIA interrogation tactics, saying flatly that he “would do it again in a minute” because the techniques worked in our obtaining actionable intel.

Appearing on NBC’s “Meet the Press,” Cheney pushed back hard against critics of the CIA’s actions:

“Torture is what the al Qaeda terrorists did to 3,000 Americans on 9/11,” Cheney said on NBC’s Meet The Press. “There is no comparison between that and what we did with respect to enhanced interrogation.”

By clicking on the video above, you can see Judge Jeanine Pirro’s no-nonsense defense of the CIA interrogators, saying “they have the high moral ground.”

 

Image Credit: Fox News

This post originally appeared on Western Journalism – Informing And Equipping Americans Who Love Freedom