19-Yr-Old With Earache Goes To Hospital, Then His Visit Turns Into The Stuff Of Nightmares

Image for representational purposes only.

It was a horrifying discovery for a Chinese man who went to the doctor with an earache. Doctors discovered a female cockroach and 25 babies were in the man’s right ear.

Mr Li, 19, went to a hospital complaining to doctors in Dongguan, in the southern Chinese region of Guangdog Province, that his right ear was itchy and painful. Dr. Yan Jing of Chang’an Xiaobian Hospital looked in the ear and saw that an insect completely blocked the man’s ear canal. A deeper look revealed 25 baby cockroaches within the canal. Doctors said the female cockroach must have laid eggs within the canal weeks earlier.

It could have been worse. Doctors said a female cockroach can lay up to 40 eggs. Reports state that the man’s ear would have been completely destroyed if he had waited any later to come to the hospital. Reports don’t state how the patient responded to the news.

This is not the first time such an incident has been reported globally. Australian doctors pulled a cockroach from a man’s ear in 2014. Like the Chinese patient, the Australian man, identified as Hendrik Helmer of Darwin, woke up with pain in his right ear. He also went to the hospital, where doctors discovered the insect.

In the Australian’s case, the patient suspected there might be a creepy crawler in his ear. He was somewhat relieved it was a cockroach.

“I was hoping it was not a poisonous spider,” Helmer told the station. “I was hoping it didn’t bite me.”

This post originally appeared on Western Journalism – Equipping You With The Truth

Do You Take Your Financial Advice From The Same Morons Who Thought China Had A Solid Economy?

So here’s a question for the Masters of the Universe who think they run our economy.

Which of you morons pinned our so-called economy to China’s growth prospects?

Was it the same clown who told hedge funds in 2004 that they should invest in companies which loaned people making $50,000 a year in Las Vegas $400,000 to buy a $100,000 house for $380,000?

Or, perhaps it was the same genius who said that after we sell these putrid mortgages to stupid rich people, we’ll sell other, slightly smarter, rich people a new security based on a bet that those putrid mortgages will not be paid?

Or maybe the same thief who told President George W. Bush—who should have known better—that the whole economy would collapse unless the Federal Government took over AIG insurance and paid off the fake insurance policies on those putrid mortgages, much of which went—oddly enough—to that thief’s company.

I couldn’t wait to wake up last Monday morning and tune in the talking media heads because watching a train wreck on Wall Street is almost as much fun as watching the night race at Talladega.

The talking heads wail, the middle class gets screwed, and the brokers leave just enough on the table to buy food with tomorrow. It’s a hell of a show. (You don’t have to worry too much. It’ll be better by the end of the week; they rarely close the casino for long.)

You’d think that the buying and selling of stock on Wall Street is the business of America.

It’s not.

If you ask most people, they’ll tell you that when they buy stock on the New York Stock Exchange or the NASDAQ, they’re “investing” in a company.

That’s just not true. Investing in a company is when you borrow on your credit cards to start your own company.

Very rarely does money you hand a stockbroker actually go to the company which the stock represents ownership in. (Usually only during an initial public offering.)

What you are usually doing is buying that stock from somebody else who bought it from somebody else going all the way back to when the stock was issued by the company. In short, you’re not funding American business; you’re either allowing the previous owner to take a loss or a profit. That’s what they call “liquidity.”

It’s not much different from playing blackjack at the MGM Grand in Las Vegas–except the odds are a little better at the corner of Tropicana and the Strip.

So, when you hear that the “market” is “down,” what that really means is that the stock which somebody may have purchased from the original company—maybe years ago—is being sold at a lower price than it was earlier.

It doesn’t mean that the company itself is losing money.

And, interestingly enough, when there is a huge sell-off in the market, do you know who makes money?

The same clowns who made money selling bad mortgages and bets against those mortgages to investors.

Seventy-five years ago, a guy named Fred Schwed wrote a book called Where Are the Customers’ Yachts? The title came from a classic Wall Street story about a visitor in New York more than a century ago. After admiring yachts Wall Street bought with money earned giving financial advice to customers, he wondered where the customers’ yachts were. Do I need to tell you how many yachts belonged to the customers (then and now)?  Here’s a hint: None.

The same clowns who tell you to buy or sell make money every time you do. You may or may not make any money, but they always do.

So, if you got a call from one of those clowns last week telling you it was time to sell–or later, after the carnage, that it was time to buy–you might have been better off putting the money in a savings account so you could, someday, buy a yacht.

By the way, the answer to the China question should be obvious since CBS News’ Lesley Stahl reported on 60 Minutes over a year ago that the Chinese were building empty cities with all the iPhone money they tricked us out of (I’m paraphrasing).

Apparently, Masters of the Universe are too busy out in Connecticut on Sunday night to watch 60 Minutes.  Or they made so much money on our housing bubble that a bigger one in China meant nothing to them. Remember that the economy of China is controlled by their Army.

Either way, the only thing the Wall Street Masters lost last week was a little sleep as they got to the office so they could make some more money to pay for their yachts.

The views expressed in this opinion article are solely those of their author and are not necessarily either shared or endorsed by WesternJournalism.com.

This post originally appeared on Western Journalism – Equipping You With The Truth

BREAKING: Insane Explosion Of Epic Proportions Captured On Camera

A massive series of explosions rocked China’s 4th largest city around midnight local time.

According to CNBC, a smaller blast, the equivalent 3 tons of TNT, triggered a larger one equaling approximately 20 tons, shaking the port city of Tianjin.

China’s “Xinhua news agency said a fire started by the explosion was ‘under control’ but said two firefighters were missing. Shockwaves from the blast could apparently be felt several kilometres away from Tianjin,” the BBC reports

“At the time of the explosion the ground was shaking fiercely, nearby cars and buildings were shaking, a few buildings’ glass all broke and everyone started to run,” Ms. Yang, an eyewitness, told local media.

Image Credit: BBC

Image Credit: BBC

The blast came with such force that many residents thought they were experiencing an earthquake and fled outside buildings to the streets.

“Some local reports indicated that residents had been warned to close their windows in case of hazardous gases,” according to CNBC.

Tianjin is a major port and industrial area about 70 miles southeast of the Chinese capital, Beijing. It is home to 7.5 million people.

This post originally appeared on Western Journalism – Equipping You With The Truth

This Could Be The Sinister Truth About The Stock Exchange Halt Officials Are Hiding

Former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani was a guest on the Fox Business show Cavuto Coast to Coast, discussing Wednesday’s sudden, mysterious, and highly unusual halt of trading on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), when he questioned the official assurances that the “technical issue” didn’t involve a possible cyber attack. Noting that neither NYSE officials nor government authorities had said what the problem was, Giuliani wryly observed something to the effect, “If they don’t know what caused it, how can they say it wasn’t a cyber attack?”

And is it possible, even plausible, that the NYSE’s very quick, almost pre-planned, assurance that a hack attack wasn’t involved in the extraordinary measures taken at the exchange was meant to divert our attention from something else that may have been — and may still be — going on?

As Western Journalism reported earlier today, all trading in all symbols was suspended on the floor of the exchange at about 11:30 a.m. ET. The Washington Times‘ coverage of the surprise event noted: “One of the world’s biggest stock exchanges had seen shares trending down throughout the morning because of economic crises in Greece and China, but all trading halted at 11:32 a.m. as data on trades and prices apparently stopped coming into the traders’ computer screens.”

Official communications from the NYSE via Twitter have been sparse and lacking in detail. As of this writing, the exchange’s official Twitter account has seen the issuance of only a handful of advisories. Among them are the two following tweets that vaguely describe the “issue”:

Image Credit: Twitter/NYSE

Image Credit: Twitter/NYSE

Image Credit: Twitter/NYSE

Image Credit: Twitter/NYSE

Hours after the shutdown of activity on the floor of the NYSE, the mystery remains as to what might have happened.

Meanwhile, many anxious investors are left to wonder and worry. Some doubters took to Twitter to express their suspicions about the source of the “technical issue” that caused trading in all securities to be halted shortly after United Airlines was forced to ground all flights in U.S. airports due to reported computer issues.

Some of the skeptical tweets centered on concerns that the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth is not being shared with the American people, many of whom have their personal wealth tied up in the stock market. The subject of China and its worsening financial difficulties has been raised by quite a few folks, as you can see below.

Screen shot 2015-07-08 at 1.59.07 PM

Screen shot 2015-07-08 at 1.58.54 PM

Screen shot 2015-07-08 at 1.58.18 PM

Screen shot 2015-07-08 at 1.58.03 PM

Screen shot 2015-07-08 at 1.56.53 PM

Screen shot 2015-07-08 at 1.56.30 PM

Screen shot 2015-07-08 at 1.55.56 PM

Screen shot 2015-07-08 at 1.55.18 PM

As Reuters reported in an article on the Chinese economy posted earlier today, Wednesday:

Chinese shares have fallen more than 30 percent in the last three weeks, and some investors fear China’s turmoil is now a bigger risk than the crisis in Greece.

Fears of a slowdown in China will be a concern for U.S. companies, especially materials and industrial companies, which derive a chunk of their profit from the region.

These events and the resulting concerns about the deteriorating condition of the Chinese financial markets add weight to the informed speculation that China — or high-level but undisclosed considerations of serious ripple-effects from China’s perilous situation — may have played some part, possibly a major role, in the mysterious and prolonged shutdown of the New York Stock Exchange.

Then, of course, there are the associated concerns about the massive cyber attacks on government computer systems as well as U.S. infrastructure for which many in the know blame the communist nation or its hired hackers.

Just yesterday, the South China Morning Post published an investigative piece with the shocking headline: “Top Hong Kong Universities caught up in major hack attack on more than 100 global institutions.”

And only seven days ago, The Daily Beast noted an FBI warning to U.S. firms to be on the lookout for Chinese hack attacks of the kind that recently compromised the personal information of millions of government workers in the database of the Office of Personnel Management.

The FBI is warning U.S. companies to be on the lookout for a malicious computer program that has been linked to the hack of the Office of Personnel Management. Security experts say the malware is known to be used by hackers in China, including those believed to be behind the OPM breach.

So, has the sketchy economic health of China — one of the world’s biggest economies and a super-important U.S. trading partner — impacted the operations of the venerable New York Stock Exchange? Despite official disclaimers that there’s no cyber attack to blame for the halt of trading, it may turn out that somebody, somewhere pulled a plug to turn off the system and keep it from crashing in spectacular fashion.

The views expressed in this opinion article are solely those of their author and are not necessarily either shared or endorsed by WesternJournalism.com.

This post originally appeared on Western Journalism – Equipping You With The Truth

This Could Be The Sinister Truth About The Stock Exchange Halt Officials Are Hiding

Former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani was a guest on the Fox Business show Cavuto Coast to Coast, discussing Wednesday’s sudden, mysterious, and highly unusual halt of trading on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), when he questioned the official assurances that the “technical issue” didn’t involve a possible cyber attack. Noting that neither NYSE officials nor government authorities had said what the problem was, Giuliani wryly observed something to the effect, “If they don’t know what caused it, how can they say it wasn’t a cyber attack?”

And is it possible, even plausible, that the NYSE’s very quick, almost pre-planned, assurance that a hack attack wasn’t involved in the extraordinary measures taken at the exchange was meant to divert our attention from something else that may have been — and may still be — going on?

As Western Journalism reported earlier today, all trading in all symbols was suspended on the floor of the exchange at about 11:30 a.m. ET. The Washington Times‘ coverage of the surprise event noted: “One of the world’s biggest stock exchanges had seen shares trending down throughout the morning because of economic crises in Greece and China, but all trading halted at 11:32 a.m. as data on trades and prices apparently stopped coming into the traders’ computer screens.”

Official communications from the NYSE via Twitter have been sparse and lacking in detail. As of this writing, the exchange’s official Twitter account has seen the issuance of only a handful of advisories. Among them are the two following tweets that vaguely describe the “issue”:

Image Credit: Twitter/NYSE

Image Credit: Twitter/NYSE

Image Credit: Twitter/NYSE

Image Credit: Twitter/NYSE

Hours after the shutdown of activity on the floor of the NYSE, the mystery remains as to what might have happened.

Meanwhile, many anxious investors are left to wonder and worry. Some doubters took to Twitter to express their suspicions about the source of the “technical issue” that caused trading in all securities to be halted shortly after United Airlines was forced to ground all flights in U.S. airports due to reported computer issues.

Some of the skeptical tweets centered on concerns that the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth is not being shared with the American people, many of whom have their personal wealth tied up in the stock market. The subject of China and its worsening financial difficulties has been raised by quite a few folks, as you can see below.

Screen shot 2015-07-08 at 1.59.07 PM

Screen shot 2015-07-08 at 1.58.54 PM

Screen shot 2015-07-08 at 1.58.18 PM

Screen shot 2015-07-08 at 1.58.03 PM

Screen shot 2015-07-08 at 1.56.53 PM

Screen shot 2015-07-08 at 1.56.30 PM

Screen shot 2015-07-08 at 1.55.56 PM

Screen shot 2015-07-08 at 1.55.18 PM

As Reuters reported in an article on the Chinese economy posted earlier today, Wednesday:

Chinese shares have fallen more than 30 percent in the last three weeks, and some investors fear China’s turmoil is now a bigger risk than the crisis in Greece.

Fears of a slowdown in China will be a concern for U.S. companies, especially materials and industrial companies, which derive a chunk of their profit from the region.

These events and the resulting concerns about the deteriorating condition of the Chinese financial markets add weight to the informed speculation that China — or high-level but undisclosed considerations of serious ripple-effects from China’s perilous situation — may have played some part, possibly a major role, in the mysterious and prolonged shutdown of the New York Stock Exchange.

Then, of course, there are the associated concerns about the massive cyber attacks on government computer systems as well as U.S. infrastructure for which many in the know blame the communist nation or its hired hackers.

Just yesterday, the South China Morning Post published an investigative piece with the shocking headline: “Top Hong Kong Universities caught up in major hack attack on more than 100 global institutions.”

And only seven days ago, The Daily Beast noted an FBI warning to U.S. firms to be on the lookout for Chinese hack attacks of the kind that recently compromised the personal information of millions of government workers in the database of the Office of Personnel Management.

The FBI is warning U.S. companies to be on the lookout for a malicious computer program that has been linked to the hack of the Office of Personnel Management. Security experts say the malware is known to be used by hackers in China, including those believed to be behind the OPM breach.

So, has the sketchy economic health of China — one of the world’s biggest economies and a super-important U.S. trading partner — impacted the operations of the venerable New York Stock Exchange? Despite official disclaimers that there’s no cyber attack to blame for the halt of trading, it may turn out that somebody, somewhere pulled a plug to turn off the system and keep it from crashing in spectacular fashion.

The views expressed in this opinion article are solely those of their author and are not necessarily either shared or endorsed by WesternJournalism.com.

This post originally appeared on Western Journalism – Equipping You With The Truth