Issa: Obama Punishes a Whistleblower

Ben Johnson, FloydReports.com

Congressman Darrell Issa has written a scathing five-page letter to the Department of Homeland Security stating it demoted an employee who blew the whistle on the department’s illegal stonewalling of Obama’s political foes. Issa, who is the chairman of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, wrote to Janet Napolitano that the action had the appearance of “retaliation” and that “Obstructing a congressional investigation is a crime.”

Issa states that Catherine Papoi, who was DHS deputy unit chief in charge of the Freedom of Information Act, was passed over for a promotion and forced to vacate her office the day after she met with investigators.

Ironically, the Associated Press reported the story the same day Barack Obama was set to receive an award for government transparency to kick off “Sunshine Week.” Obama canceled the event.

Last March, Papoi went to the DHS Inspector General to complain of “hundreds” of cases of illegal stonewalling. The IG report has yet to be released a year later. She then turned to Issa.

Papoi said officials are “breaking the law by knowingly and intentionally delaying and obstructing the release of agency records.”

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Eric Holder Plays Race Card for Obama

Members of the Project 21 black leadership network are appalled that Attorney General Eric Holder used the race card to block congressional inquiries into the Justice Department’s silence and possible mishandling of a race-fueled voting rights case.

“Eric Holder is sending a consistent and unfortunate message that we should expect justice to be applied only on the terms set by him and President Obama. This disregard for the rule of law is made worse by divisive rhetoric that is anathema to his sworn duties to uphold our Constitution as Attorney General,” said Project 21′s Jerome Hudson. “Holder’s apparent willingness to turn a blind eye to equal justice is one more example of how radical and out of touch this presidency is with the American people.”

Holder engaged in racial politics during a subcommittee hearing of the House Appropriations Committee on March 1. Representative John Culberson (R-TX) brought up that the U.S. Department of Justice was uncooperative with investigators from the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights regarding allegations that political appointees intervened in a voting rights case against members of the New Black Panther Party charged with restricting the access of white voters to a Philadelphia polling place on Election Day 2008. Holder harshly criticized scrutiny of the case, calling it “inappropriate” to compare this case to past government defenses of civil rights, adding, “I think it does a great disservice to people who put their lives on the line for my people.”

“Holder’s comment about ‘my people’ illustrates how the Attorney General sees the world through a color-coded lens,” said Project 21 Fellow Deneen Borelli.

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Eric Holder’s Admission? DoJ “Does Not Enforce the Law on the Basis of Race”

Ben Johnson, FloydReports.com

Attorney General Eric Holder had something of a meltdown on Capitol Hill today when a Republican Congressman pressed him on his preferential treatment of the New Black Panther Party. Rep. John Culberson, R-TX, read a statement from a Democrat calling the Black Panthers’ actions the worst case of voter intimidation he had ever seen. In response, Holder huffed that, while the Panther’s nightstick-wielding threats were “inappropriate,” the assessment was demeaning to “my people.”

Perhaps more important than his admission that he does not see the American people as “his people” is a line he uttered shortly afterwards.

After Culberson cited “overwhelming evidence that your Department of Justice refuses to protect the rights of anybody other than African-Americans to vote,” Holder stated, “This Department of Justice does not enforce the law on the basis of race.”

Holder intended this as a denial, but it seems more like a Freudian admission.

After all, it is precisely what Holder’s Justice Department stands accused of, not enforcing the law on the basis of race.

Not only conservatives but Democrats such as Bartle Bull and apolitical observers….

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Report: Black Panther Case Put Politics Above Law

Hans von Spakovsky, The Foundry Blog

The final version of the Interim Report by the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights on the investigation of the New Black Panther Party voter intimidation case was released late last week and is available on the commission’s website. Get it while it’s hot.

With the expiration of the terms of several commissioners, new appointees by President Obama and others doing the administration’s bidding will soon control a majority of the commission seats.  It seems unlikely the new majority will continue the investigation into the real reason for the dismissal of the NBBP lawsuit.

Given the raucous and obstreperous behavior of the Democratic commissioners, with the unfortunate help of Vice Chairman Abigail Thernstrom, to stymie the investigation and protect the Obama administration, it is also almost a sure bet that nothing further will be done to investigate the sworn testimony about the hostility to race neutral enforcement of civil rights laws at Justice that the Commission uncovered, or the unlawful stonewalling by the Department of the Commission’s investigation.

The Commission’s report is devastating, particularly the statements of Commissioners Todd Gaziano (with whom I work at Heritage), Gail Heriot, and Peter Kirsanow, and their rebuttals to the nonsubstantive, almost comical dissent of Democratic Commissioners Michael Yaki and Arlan Melendez.  Also worth reading is a post on the report of The Washington Post’s Jennifer Rubin., as well as comments by former Justice Department lawyer J. Christian Adams.

As Commissioner Gaziano says in his statement that is included in the 210-page report, the Commission’s investigation was about a possible cover up of a:

racial double standard in law enforcement in the Civil Rights Division of the U.S. Department of Justice. The usual Washington refrain is that the cover-up is always worse than the original offense.  But in this case, the underlying problem may be as damning as the wrongful cover-up – and possibly worse….[Justice Department lawyers testified] that there is a pervasive hostility to the race-neutral enforcement of the civil rights laws….Such a racial double standard in law enforcement would be at war with the very notion of a federal Civil Rights Division devoted to the equal protection of the laws.  Yet, the Department of Justice is unquestionably hostile to any serious investigation of these allegations.

The dissenting commissioners make the false claim that there was no evidence to support any of the allegations, disregarding and ignoring the sworn testimony of two Justice Department whistleblowers and numerous other witnesses.  But as Jennifer Rubin succinctly points out for The Washington Post, the report shows that….

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The Investigations Begin: Holder on the Hot Seat in Black Panther Case

Ben Johnson, FloydReports.com

New Congressional leaders have begun their investigations into the most potent scandal facing the Obama administration, one that seems destined to expose injustice at the highest levels of government. Rep. Lamar Smith, R-TX, the new chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, has opened a probe into the Justice Department’s handling of the Black Panther case in a letter to Attorney General Eric Holder. Smith is looking into whether the case’s dismissal, and the underlying culture of the department’s Voting Rights division, show a decision to deny justice to a broad category of Americans based on race. In the five-page letter, Smith writes, “Allegations that the Civil Rights Division has engaged in a practice of race-biased enforcement of voting rights law must be investigated by the Committee.”

In his sworn testimony before the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, whistleblower Christopher Coates — who then headed the Voting Rights division — testified to a “deep-seated opposition to the equal enforcement of the” law “for the protection of white voters.” J. Christian Adams agreed that the department indicated it would not prosecute cases against a minority defendant on behalf of a white plaintiff. Coates remembered Julie Fernandes, Obama’s Deputy Assistant Attorney General for Civil Rights, telling DoJ employees “the Obama administration was only interested in bringing…cases that would provide political equality for racial and language minority voters.”

Four other employees have….

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