Megyn Kelly Interviews Man Who Helped Develop CIA Interrogation Techniques

kellyinterrogation

Fox News’ Megyn Kelly got a big interview this week following the release of the Senate Intelligence Committee report on CIA interrogations in the aftermath of the terrorist attacks on America on September 11, 2001. It was compelling TV, and journalism. Dr. James Mitchell, a former Air Force psychologist, contracted with the CIA to help develop a program to interrogate CIA detainees while America, and those tasked to protect this country, prepared for a second wave of attacks.

Mitchell had spoken with the British newspaper, The Guardian, back in April, after an executive summary of the Senate Intelligence report had been leaked to McClatchy News. At the time, as reported by The Guardian, Mitchell “mounted a full-throated defense of the Bush administration’s counter-terrorism policies and attacked ‘partisan Democrats’ for ‘throwing me under the bus’ and ‘rewriting history.’” Now he clearly feels even more free to speak out.

Mitchell was never interviewed by Sen. Dianne Feinstein’s (D-CA) committee. In fact, none of the CIA people involved in the interrogations, nor the directors or deputy directors, were interviewed. In other words, the purpose of this report was not to actually get to the truth of what happened. It was an attempt, for various political and PR reasons, to accuse and indict the Bush administration and the CIA for allegedly using torture on the detainees.

Mitchell revealed that Khalid Sheikh Mohammed (KSM) didn’t break, or provide information that eventually led to the killing of Osama bin Laden, because of waterboarding, but rather because of other EITs (Enhanced Interrogation Techniques). The technique that did work on KSM, according to the American Enterprise Institute’s Marc Thiessen, a former George W. Bush speechwriter, was sleep deprivation. But Mitchell revealed something that KSM did tell him:

“Khalid Sheikh Mohammed told me personally, ‘Your country will turn on you, the liberal media will turn on you, the people will grow tired of this, they will turn on you, and when they do, you are going to be abandoned.’”

What comes through in Megyn Kelly’s interview is a thoughtful, patriotic American who was moved by the image of Americans leaping out of World Trade Center buildings, and by the courage of those on Flight 93 who helped bring the plane down, rather than allow it to successfully strike the third of three targets of the “decapitation” that Mitchell said was their goal. The terrorists hit our financial center in New York, they hit the Pentagon—the headquarters of the U.S. military—and the third plane was intended to crash into the Capitol building in Washington, D.C.

America is divided over this, but a recent Washington Post – ABC poll shows that the American public overwhelmingly think that “the CIA treatment of suspected terrorists” was justified, by a margin of 59% to 31%. Clearly a significant majority believe the CIA was trying to protect this country at that time, and aren’t too worried about the few cases of excess—even death—that occurred. They don’t see it as a “stain” on our country. In fact, many view the stain as this one-sided report that cherry-picked information and revealed selective portions of emails, contradicted by other portions not revealed in the report—if that’s what they needed to make their case. Many believe that the release of this report has given aid and comfort to America’s enemies, and put American lives at increased risk.

It turns out that KSM was right about the “liberal media,” but it seems that a significant majority of the American people are quite okay with what was done to these terrorists—and other detainees—and don’t believe it damaged us as a country. Many of those in the liberal media—such as Rachel Maddow of MSNBC, Jane Mayer of the New Yorker (who actually interviewed Dr. Mitchell back in 2005), and Erin Burnett of CNN—freely call what happened “torture.” To them, it’s not an opinion, it’s a fact.

Kudos to Megyn Kelly for getting the interview, which aired in two parts on Monday and Tuesday nights this week. I urge you to watch for yourself, and to also read this column, “The Feinstein Report is Going to Cost Us,” by Andrew McCarthy. He was the lawyer who successfully prosecuted the Blind Sheikh, the man responsible for the first World Trade Center bombing in 1993. McCarthy has a lot of interesting things to say about the report, such as this:

“As I have frequently argued here over the years, there is a world of difference between what is couched in political rhetoric as ‘torture,’ a conversation stopper that the Left cavalierly applies to every instance of prisoner abuse, and the federal crime of torture, which has a strict legal definition and is a difficult offense to prove, precisely to ensure that torture is not trivialized.”

You can watch Kelly’s interview with Dr. Mitchell here.

 

This article originally appeared at AIM.org and is reprinted here with permission.

The views expressed in this opinion article are solely those of their author and are not necessarily either shared or endorsed by WesternJournalism.com.

This post originally appeared on Western Journalism – Informing And Equipping Americans Who Love Freedom

Hillary’s “People” Cover Flops

peoplecovers

It’s been a rough year for Hillary Clinton on the sales front. First it was her book “Hard Choices” that failed to sell despite a massive P.R. campaign, and now, as Adweek reports, the June 16 issue of People Magazine, featuring Clinton on the cover, was the worst selling issue of the year.

The Clinton cover sold just 503,890 copies, which is well below the magazine’s average of 700,000-plus. The best-selling issue was a tribute to the late Robin Williams on August 25, which sold over one million copies.

 

This article originally appeared at AIM.org and is reprinted here with permission.

This post originally appeared on Western Journalism – Informing And Equipping Americans Who Love Freedom

A Time For Torture

Photo credit: LEE SNIDER PHOTO IMAGES / Shutterstock.com

A poll released this week found 51 percent of Americans approve of the harsh interrogation tactics the CIA used immediately after the 9/11 terrorist attacks.

Imagine what those numbers would have been on Sept. 12, 2001.

The NBC/Wall Street Journal survey is in sync with the results of similar opinion polls that show a majority of Americans are not naive about what “torture” is or isn’t, or when it should be used.

About half of those polled called the CIA’s use of waterboarding, sleep deprivation, and other tough interview methods “torture”; but a majority still approved of it.

About 30 percent of Americans — most of them Democrats — told NBC they think the CIA went too far in the early days of the Bush administration. About 80 percent of Republicans approved the CIA’s tactics.

Dick Cheney got beat up this week by the liberal media, Senate Democrats, and the holier-than-thou crowd for refusing to use the word “torture” to describe the CIA’s methods of extracting information from evil people who wanted to kill us or who knew where Osama Bin Laden’s home address was.

As for the future, 45 percent of those polled say the CIA should continue to use the same interrogation tactics, while 28 percent said they should not.

Interrogating our enemies during war is a dirty business.

It’s not anything like that classy old 1950s quiz show “What’s My Line,” where a panel of well-dressed celebrities like Steve Allen had 10 questions to figure out the occupations of the mystery contestants.

“Mr. Ramzi Ahmed Yousef, did you ever mastermind a plan to blow up the World Trade Center?”

“No.”

“OK, panel. Eight down and two to go.”

I have a little story for anyone who thinks America’s rough interrogation tactics really deserve to be called “torture.”

During the mid-1980s, when I was on a vacation in Italy, my wife and I were being protected by the U.S. Secret Service and its Italian equivalent.

A few years earlier, the leftist Red Brigade had been terrorizing Italy, assassinating people, kidnapping business executives, setting off bombs, robbing banks, and blowing off people’s kneecaps as they walked down the sidewalks.

In 1981, after the Red Brigade kidnapped U.S. General James Dozier, it took Italy’s counter-terrorism agency 42 days to rescue him — without firing a shot.

I asked one of the unshaven, rugged, glass-eating Italian secret servicemen working in our motorcade detail how they finally found out where General Dozier was being held.

He told me that after his colleagues caught a few members of the Red Brigade, they were taken to the basement and interrogated.

The terrorists became very talkative after their genitals were placed in a vise.

The agents who used this persuasive technique — which also led to the capture of hundreds of Red Brigade members and put the deadly terrorist group out of business — were disciplined by their superiors.

They were suspended for five days and went to the beach.

As the Italians proved, sometimes in war you have to use “enhanced” interrogation methods to get the successful ending you want.

In 2001, we found ourselves in a bloody war against terrorists. The White House knew it. The CIA knew it. Even the media and Democrats in Congress knew it. The American people figured it out too.

What the CIA did to extract information from the Islamist terrorists was not nice, but it was not really torture.

We shouldn’t be second-guessing and beating up on the CIA, George W. Bush, Dick Cheney, and all the other men and women who’ve helped to keep us safe for the last 14 years.

We should be thanking them.

Merry Christmas.

 

Photo credit: LEE SNIDER PHOTO IMAGES / Shutterstock.com

The views expressed in this opinion article are solely those of their author and are not necessarily either shared or endorsed by WesternJournalism.com.

This post originally appeared on Western Journalism – Informing And Equipping Americans Who Love Freedom

US Finds North Korea “Certainly Involved” In Cyberattack On Sony

Photo credit: youtube

American officials have concluded that North Korea was “certainly involved” in the cyberattack on Sony over “The Interview,” a comedic movie that included the assassination of Kim Jong-un.

Officials said that the White House was debating whether to publicly accuse North Korea of a cyberattack or not.

Sony decided to cancel the movie’s release after additional threats from the hackers were made–even the theaters themselves might have been hacked if the movie was released.

Some officials within the administration argue that it is time to call out and confront North Korea, while others say that such an action is precisely what North Korea wants.

Bernadette Meehan, a spokeswoman for the National Security Council, said that the US government is “considering a range of options in weighing a potential response.”

Hours before the Sony announcement to cancel the movie, four prominent US theater chains- Regal Entertainment, AMC Entertainment, Cinemark, and Carmike Cinemas- said that they would not be showing the movie.

A warning this week to Sony’s computers said that if “The Interview” was released, the “world would be full of fear.”

The warning said: “Remember the 11th of September 2001. We recommend you to keep yourself distant from the places at that time.”

Intelligence officials have concluded that the attack was both state-sponsored and more devastating than any cyberattack on American soil.

One intelligence official commented that “this was of a sophistication that a year ago we would have said was beyond the North’s capabilities.”

What do you think the US government’s response to the cyberattack should be?

 

h/t: NY Times

This post originally appeared on Western Journalism – Informing And Equipping Americans Who Love Freedom

Rubio Rips Obama As Worst Presidential Negotiator Since Carter

Marco Rubio

In the most significant shift in U.S. policy towards Cuba in 50 years, President Barack Obama announced that the two countries will begin talks to restore diplomatic relations. The announcement by Obama followed the release of American government contractor, Alan Gross, who had been imprisoned in Cuba for five years. After five decades of isolation failed to establish democracy and prosperity in the island country, Obama declared that he was going to relax travel, banking, and commerce restrictions.

Senator Marco Rubio (R-FL) told Fox News Channel’s Bill Hemmer Wednesday morning that he is glad Gross is returning to U.S. soil but disagreed with the exchange of three Cuban prisoners because of the precedent it sets.

“We’re all glad that Mr. Gross is going to be back with his family. He never did anything wrong. He was not a spy. He was not a criminal. He was a hostage. And it’s unfortunate that the Cuban government held him for five years and basically almost killed him in captivity. I’m not in favor of the process by which his release was acquired because I think it does set a very dangerous precedent. It puts a price on every American abroad. Governments now know that if they can take an American hostage, they can get very significant concessions from the United States.”

Senior U.S. officials claim that Gross was released for humanitarian reasons after five years of captivity in a Cuban prison. The three Cubans–Ramón Labanino, Antonio Guerrero, and Gerardo Hernandez–were being released in exchange for an “intelligence asset” after they were arrested in 1998 for being part of a spy network.

Rubio criticized the Cuban regime, saying that the Cuban people will not enjoy freedom.

“They’re creating no economic openings. There is no concessions on freedom of speech, no concessions on elections, no concessions on the freedom to have alternative political parties, no concessions on ever having elections or anything of that matter. What democratic concessions?”

“It is par for the course with an administration that is constantly giving away unilateral concessions, whether it’s Iran, or in this case Cuba, in exchange for nothing.”

Rubio concluded,

“Barack Obama is the worst negotiator that we’ve had as president, since at least Jimmy Carter, and maybe in the modern history of this country.”

The Florida Senator, whose parents immigrated to the U.S. from Cuba in 1956, will be the chairman of the Foreign Relations Committee’s subcommittee on the Western Hemisphere in January.

This post originally appeared on Western Journalism – Informing And Equipping Americans Who Love Freedom